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Large trucks drag reduction using active flow control

Large trucks drag reduction using active flow control
Large trucks drag reduction using active flow control
Aerodynamic drag is the cause for more than two-thirds of the fuel consumption of large trucks at highway speeds. Due to functionality considerations, the aerodynamic efficiency of the aft-regions of large trucks was traditionally sacrificed. This leads to massively separated flow at the lee-side of truck-trailers, with an associated drag penalty of at least a third of the total aerodynamic drag. Active Flow Control (AFC), the capability to alter the flow behavior using unsteady, localized energy injection, can very effectively delay boundary layer separation. By attaching a compact and relatively inexpensive “add-on” AFC device to the back side of truck-trailers (or by modifying it when possible) the flow separating from it could be redirected to turn into the lee-side of the truck, increasing the back pressure, thus significantly reducing drag. A comprehensive and aggressive research plan that combines actuator development, computational fluid dynamics and bench-top as well as wind tunnel experiments was performed. The research uses an array of 15 newly developed Suction and Oscillatory Blowing actuators housed inside a circular cylinder attached to the aft edges of a generic 2D truck model. Preliminary results indicate a net drag reduction of 10% or more.
1613-7763
115-133
Seifert, A.
141209bd-6312-4a42-a18c-9f7d1089a25f
Stalnov, O.
6ca7508b-4d32-4e46-9158-ef8f03795ece
Sperber, D.
0864d4e7-026b-4302-b217-598f73e9fba9
Arwatz, G.
3082d211-9fa9-4bdc-bcfd-cc7f88b653b8
Palei, V.
69e84327-0e9b-4b5f-8197-134489ad5488
David, S.
4db05129-f132-4381-a2ac-7fa03222b069
Dayan, I.
a44d92bc-fad9-414e-90a7-f53fbe5fe56f
Fono, I.
ea0f681c-d189-4fc7-832a-ed4009d3c040
Seifert, A.
141209bd-6312-4a42-a18c-9f7d1089a25f
Stalnov, O.
6ca7508b-4d32-4e46-9158-ef8f03795ece
Sperber, D.
0864d4e7-026b-4302-b217-598f73e9fba9
Arwatz, G.
3082d211-9fa9-4bdc-bcfd-cc7f88b653b8
Palei, V.
69e84327-0e9b-4b5f-8197-134489ad5488
David, S.
4db05129-f132-4381-a2ac-7fa03222b069
Dayan, I.
a44d92bc-fad9-414e-90a7-f53fbe5fe56f
Fono, I.
ea0f681c-d189-4fc7-832a-ed4009d3c040

Seifert, A., Stalnov, O., Sperber, D., Arwatz, G., Palei, V., David, S., Dayan, I. and Fono, I. (2009) Large trucks drag reduction using active flow control. Lecture Notes in Applied and Computational Mechanics, 41, 115-133. (doi:10.1007/978-3-540-85070-0_10).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aerodynamic drag is the cause for more than two-thirds of the fuel consumption of large trucks at highway speeds. Due to functionality considerations, the aerodynamic efficiency of the aft-regions of large trucks was traditionally sacrificed. This leads to massively separated flow at the lee-side of truck-trailers, with an associated drag penalty of at least a third of the total aerodynamic drag. Active Flow Control (AFC), the capability to alter the flow behavior using unsteady, localized energy injection, can very effectively delay boundary layer separation. By attaching a compact and relatively inexpensive “add-on” AFC device to the back side of truck-trailers (or by modifying it when possible) the flow separating from it could be redirected to turn into the lee-side of the truck, increasing the back pressure, thus significantly reducing drag. A comprehensive and aggressive research plan that combines actuator development, computational fluid dynamics and bench-top as well as wind tunnel experiments was performed. The research uses an array of 15 newly developed Suction and Oscillatory Blowing actuators housed inside a circular cylinder attached to the aft edges of a generic 2D truck model. Preliminary results indicate a net drag reduction of 10% or more.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 30 September 2009
Organisations: Aeronautics, Astronautics & Comp. Eng

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 344208
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/344208
ISSN: 1613-7763
PURE UUID: 9c430c7b-176c-4004-a853-cd449c43710a

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Oct 2012 09:29
Last modified: 26 Feb 2019 17:31

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