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Point-to-point Learning in Human Motor Systems

Point-to-point Learning in Human Motor Systems
Point-to-point Learning in Human Motor Systems
Motor planning is one of the key processes in human motor systems. It accounts for how the Central Nervous System (CNS) generates the desired trajectory for the human to follow in order to achieve the given task. This work focuses on a special task: point-to-point tracking. For this task, point-to-point learning is used with the aim for gaining a deeper understanding of motor learning. Point-to-point learning control (LC) not only naturally matches the task, but also provides tools to analyse learning in human motion planning. It is observed that the simulation results obtained by using tracking performance failed to match the observed motion performed by humans captured from experiments. It was then shown that additional objective, namely minimal jerk, is required to provide satisfactory results, suggesting that humans consider objectives other than tracking during motion planning. This finding provides experimental and mathematical validation to current hypotheses of human motor planning.
5923-5928
Zhou, Shou-Han
528f9270-a93a-40b5-98ee-66794057b0dd
Tan, Ying
23bafadb-0655-48fe-9937-c59f01cb58ab
Oetomo, Denny
88a00d0d-e242-411c-9075-536628e0c782
Freeman, C T
ccdd1272-cdc7-43fb-a1bb-b1ef0bdf5815
Burdet, Etienne
963b1ab0-1d8a-48a5-b5da-a189d13e88f6
Mareels, Iven
4347bb59-c0ef-4029-a9da-4f71ad22ad23
Zhou, Shou-Han
528f9270-a93a-40b5-98ee-66794057b0dd
Tan, Ying
23bafadb-0655-48fe-9937-c59f01cb58ab
Oetomo, Denny
88a00d0d-e242-411c-9075-536628e0c782
Freeman, C T
ccdd1272-cdc7-43fb-a1bb-b1ef0bdf5815
Burdet, Etienne
963b1ab0-1d8a-48a5-b5da-a189d13e88f6
Mareels, Iven
4347bb59-c0ef-4029-a9da-4f71ad22ad23

Zhou, Shou-Han, Tan, Ying, Oetomo, Denny, Freeman, C T, Burdet, Etienne and Mareels, Iven (2013) Point-to-point Learning in Human Motor Systems. American Control Conference, 17-19 June 2013, United States. pp. 5923-5928 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)

Abstract

Motor planning is one of the key processes in human motor systems. It accounts for how the Central Nervous System (CNS) generates the desired trajectory for the human to follow in order to achieve the given task. This work focuses on a special task: point-to-point tracking. For this task, point-to-point learning is used with the aim for gaining a deeper understanding of motor learning. Point-to-point learning control (LC) not only naturally matches the task, but also provides tools to analyse learning in human motion planning. It is observed that the simulation results obtained by using tracking performance failed to match the observed motion performed by humans captured from experiments. It was then shown that additional objective, namely minimal jerk, is required to provide satisfactory results, suggesting that humans consider objectives other than tracking during motion planning. This finding provides experimental and mathematical validation to current hypotheses of human motor planning.

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More information

Published date: 17 June 2013
Venue - Dates: American Control Conference, 17-19 June 2013, United States, 2013-06-17
Organisations: EEE

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 344298
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/344298
PURE UUID: f3639064-86a2-44f1-8ea0-6f69e4ce5cfd

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Oct 2012 23:27
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:51

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