The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The co-distribution of Plasmodium falciparum and hookworm among African schoolchildren

The co-distribution of Plasmodium falciparum and hookworm among African schoolchildren
The co-distribution of Plasmodium falciparum and hookworm among African schoolchildren
BACKGROUND: Surprisingly little is known about the geographical overlap between malaria and other tropical diseases, including helminth infections. This is despite the potential public health importance of co-infection and synergistic opportunities for control. METHODS: Statistical models are presented that predict the large-scale distribution of hookworm in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), based on the relationship between prevalence of infection among schoolchildren and remotely sensed environmental variables. Using a climate-based spatial model of the transmission potential for Plasmodium falciparum malaria, adjusted for urbanization, the spatial congruence of populations at coincident risk of infection is determined. RESULTS: The model of hookworm indicates that the infection is widespread throughout Africa and that, of the 179.3 million school-aged children who live on the continent, 50.0 (95% CI: 48.9-51.1) million (27.9% of total population) are infected with hookworm and 45.1 (95% CI: 43.9-46) million are estimated to be at risk of coincident infection. CONCLUSION: Malaria and hookworm infection are widespread throughout SSA and over a quarter of school-aged children in sub-Saharan Africa appear to be at risk of coincident infection and thus at enhanced risk of clinical disease. The results suggest that the control of parasitic helminths and of malaria in school children could be viewed as essential co-contributors to promoting the health of schoolchildren.
africa south of the sahara/epidemiology, animals, child, child preschool, climate, hookworm, infections/*complications/*epidemiology/transmission, humans, logistic models, malaria, falciparum/*complications/*epidemiology/transmission, predictive value of tests, prevalence, satellite communications, schools, sensitivity and specificity
1475-2875
99
Brooker, S.
11cee750-cf37-4179-b985-081f8549a4cd
Clements, A.C.
26bb7239-e58c-4f3e-a5ce-97817fb85962
Hotez, P.J.
75a5058d-a6d3-4ed3-b171-1d20204d011a
Hay, S.I.
18d621e0-2813-4c05-b2b7-09df3f24aca7
Tatem, A.J.
6c6de104-a5f9-46e0-bb93-a1a7c980513e
Bundy, D.A.
fa576242-c770-48b4-9624-889ed7a04cab
Snow, R.W.
1df934dd-70f4-4bf1-8a98-7feb0207d796
Brooker, S.
11cee750-cf37-4179-b985-081f8549a4cd
Clements, A.C.
26bb7239-e58c-4f3e-a5ce-97817fb85962
Hotez, P.J.
75a5058d-a6d3-4ed3-b171-1d20204d011a
Hay, S.I.
18d621e0-2813-4c05-b2b7-09df3f24aca7
Tatem, A.J.
6c6de104-a5f9-46e0-bb93-a1a7c980513e
Bundy, D.A.
fa576242-c770-48b4-9624-889ed7a04cab
Snow, R.W.
1df934dd-70f4-4bf1-8a98-7feb0207d796

Brooker, S., Clements, A.C., Hotez, P.J., Hay, S.I., Tatem, A.J., Bundy, D.A. and Snow, R.W. (2006) The co-distribution of Plasmodium falciparum and hookworm among African schoolchildren. Malaria Journal, 5, 99. (doi:10.1186/1475-2875-5-99). (PMID:17083720)

Record type: Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Surprisingly little is known about the geographical overlap between malaria and other tropical diseases, including helminth infections. This is despite the potential public health importance of co-infection and synergistic opportunities for control. METHODS: Statistical models are presented that predict the large-scale distribution of hookworm in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), based on the relationship between prevalence of infection among schoolchildren and remotely sensed environmental variables. Using a climate-based spatial model of the transmission potential for Plasmodium falciparum malaria, adjusted for urbanization, the spatial congruence of populations at coincident risk of infection is determined. RESULTS: The model of hookworm indicates that the infection is widespread throughout Africa and that, of the 179.3 million school-aged children who live on the continent, 50.0 (95% CI: 48.9-51.1) million (27.9% of total population) are infected with hookworm and 45.1 (95% CI: 43.9-46) million are estimated to be at risk of coincident infection. CONCLUSION: Malaria and hookworm infection are widespread throughout SSA and over a quarter of school-aged children in sub-Saharan Africa appear to be at risk of coincident infection and thus at enhanced risk of clinical disease. The results suggest that the control of parasitic helminths and of malaria in school children could be viewed as essential co-contributors to promoting the health of schoolchildren.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 3 November 2006
Keywords: africa south of the sahara/epidemiology, animals, child, child preschool, climate, hookworm, infections/*complications/*epidemiology/transmission, humans, logistic models, malaria, falciparum/*complications/*epidemiology/transmission, predictive value of tests, prevalence, satellite communications, schools, sensitivity and specificity
Organisations: Geography & Environment, PHEW – P (Population Health)

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 344408
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/344408
ISSN: 1475-2875
PURE UUID: 8c3dc199-a948-44f4-807e-3b30efc41da7
ORCID for A.J. Tatem: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7270-941X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Feb 2013 15:00
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:28

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: S. Brooker
Author: A.C. Clements
Author: P.J. Hotez
Author: S.I. Hay
Author: A.J. Tatem ORCID iD
Author: D.A. Bundy
Author: R.W. Snow

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×