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Eco-evolutionary dynamics: disentangling phenotypic, environmental and population fluctuations

Eco-evolutionary dynamics: disentangling phenotypic, environmental and population fluctuations
Eco-evolutionary dynamics: disentangling phenotypic, environmental and population fluctuations
Decomposing variation in population growth into contributions from both ecological and evolutionary processes is of fundamental concern, particularly in a world characterized by rapid responses to anthropogenic threats. Although the impact of ecological change on evolutionary response has long been acknowledged, the converse has predominantly been neglected, especially empirically. By applying a recently published conceptual framework, we assess and contrast the relative importance of phenotypic and environmental variability on annual population growth in five ungulate populations. In four of the five populations, the contribution of phenotypic variability was greater than the contribution of environmental variability, although not significantly so. The similarity in the contributions of environment and phenotype suggests that neither is worthy of neglect. Population growth is a consequence of multiple processes, which strengthens arguments advocating integrated approaches to assess how populations respond to their environments.
eco-evolutionary dynamics, ecology, evolution, phenotype, population
0962-8436
1491-1498
Ezard, Thomas H.G.
a143a893-07d0-4673-a2dd-cea2cd7e1374
Cote, S. D.
aba264c4-4a11-4926-8f80-16ee7167f8da
Pelletier, F.
8c00c8a0-0399-4feb-af98-df7754dc0b6f
Ezard, Thomas H.G.
a143a893-07d0-4673-a2dd-cea2cd7e1374
Cote, S. D.
aba264c4-4a11-4926-8f80-16ee7167f8da
Pelletier, F.
8c00c8a0-0399-4feb-af98-df7754dc0b6f

Ezard, Thomas H.G., Cote, S. D. and Pelletier, F. (2009) Eco-evolutionary dynamics: disentangling phenotypic, environmental and population fluctuations. Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society B Biological Sciences, 364 (1523), 1491-1498. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2009.0006).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Decomposing variation in population growth into contributions from both ecological and evolutionary processes is of fundamental concern, particularly in a world characterized by rapid responses to anthropogenic threats. Although the impact of ecological change on evolutionary response has long been acknowledged, the converse has predominantly been neglected, especially empirically. By applying a recently published conceptual framework, we assess and contrast the relative importance of phenotypic and environmental variability on annual population growth in five ungulate populations. In four of the five populations, the contribution of phenotypic variability was greater than the contribution of environmental variability, although not significantly so. The similarity in the contributions of environment and phenotype suggests that neither is worthy of neglect. Population growth is a consequence of multiple processes, which strengthens arguments advocating integrated approaches to assess how populations respond to their environments.

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More information

Published date: June 2009
Keywords: eco-evolutionary dynamics, ecology, evolution, phenotype, population
Organisations: Environmental

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 344729
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/344729
ISSN: 0962-8436
PURE UUID: 0fec1a77-9b91-412b-87e5-3a9911cc44f9
ORCID for Thomas H.G. Ezard: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8305-6605

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Date deposited: 31 Oct 2012 11:35
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 03:43

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Contributors

Author: Thomas H.G. Ezard ORCID iD
Author: S. D. Cote
Author: F. Pelletier

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