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The sublime aesthetic and nineteenth-century representations of the Victoria Falls

The sublime aesthetic and nineteenth-century representations of the Victoria Falls
The sublime aesthetic and nineteenth-century representations of the Victoria Falls
Recent academic fashions have posited visual images of colonial landscape space as forming part of a network of intellectual influences that promoted both a culture of imperialism and an imperial culture in the nineteenth century. Frequently these analyses concentrate on constructing an overarching socio-political interpretation into which to place this art, thereby ignoring the influence of artistic and aesthetic theory in the creation, assessment and reception of these images. This paper seeks to reconsider the role of art theory and the philosophy of aesthetics in the context of imperial image production. Thus, it explains the response of British artists and writers to the terra incognita presented by a landscape vista in sub-Saharan Africa, the landscape of an unknown territory, at the moment of its initial exploration and artistic delineation by Europeans.
124-135
McAleer, John
dd99ce15-2c73-4ed3-a49d-89ee5c13832a
McAleer, John
dd99ce15-2c73-4ed3-a49d-89ee5c13832a

McAleer, John (2004) The sublime aesthetic and nineteenth-century representations of the Victoria Falls. [in special issue: Re-Discovering Aesthetics] Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics, 1 (3), Winter Issue, 124-135.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Recent academic fashions have posited visual images of colonial landscape space as forming part of a network of intellectual influences that promoted both a culture of imperialism and an imperial culture in the nineteenth century. Frequently these analyses concentrate on constructing an overarching socio-political interpretation into which to place this art, thereby ignoring the influence of artistic and aesthetic theory in the creation, assessment and reception of these images. This paper seeks to reconsider the role of art theory and the philosophy of aesthetics in the context of imperial image production. Thus, it explains the response of British artists and writers to the terra incognita presented by a landscape vista in sub-Saharan Africa, the landscape of an unknown territory, at the moment of its initial exploration and artistic delineation by Europeans.

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Published date: 2004
Organisations: History

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 344834
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/344834
PURE UUID: 16dfd589-b88b-4170-962d-c181c499a637

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Date deposited: 19 Feb 2013 17:07
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 05:13

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