The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Fair cuts? The impact of British public service pension reform on workers in the main occupations

Fair cuts? The impact of British public service pension reform on workers in the main occupations
Fair cuts? The impact of British public service pension reform on workers in the main occupations
Public service pensions have been a fundamental component of the British pension system in the post-war period and recent reform initiatives have caused political controversy. This article assesses the impact of the Conservative/Liberal government's public sector pension reform plans of 2011 for different public sector workers. It simulates their projected pension outcomes, assuming people contribute to the new system throughout their working lives. In particular, we examine the government's claim that the move away from final to average salary schemes will make pensions fairer for women and lower paid workers. The article shows that the reforms are indeed fair, if measured by the government's standards: retirement is delayed for all, but the lowest skilled and women lose least and some even gain higher pensions without paying proportionately more. Despite austerity, recent British pension reforms reflect a greater awareness of social inequality than many would expect and they have been built on more cross-party agreement than apparent at first sight.
public service pension reform, UK, fairness, pension outcomes, average salary schemes
1474-7464
1-18
Bridgen, Paul
6a2060f6-cbab-47d4-a831-ff82350055c9
Meyer, Traute
ee469bf0-ab32-43ac-9f25-1261c24123fe
Bridgen, Paul
6a2060f6-cbab-47d4-a831-ff82350055c9
Meyer, Traute
ee469bf0-ab32-43ac-9f25-1261c24123fe

Bridgen, Paul and Meyer, Traute (2012) Fair cuts? The impact of British public service pension reform on workers in the main occupations. Social Policy and Society, 1-18. (doi:10.1017/S1474746412000541).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Public service pensions have been a fundamental component of the British pension system in the post-war period and recent reform initiatives have caused political controversy. This article assesses the impact of the Conservative/Liberal government's public sector pension reform plans of 2011 for different public sector workers. It simulates their projected pension outcomes, assuming people contribute to the new system throughout their working lives. In particular, we examine the government's claim that the move away from final to average salary schemes will make pensions fairer for women and lower paid workers. The article shows that the reforms are indeed fair, if measured by the government's standards: retirement is delayed for all, but the lowest skilled and women lose least and some even gain higher pensions without paying proportionately more. Despite austerity, recent British pension reforms reflect a greater awareness of social inequality than many would expect and they have been built on more cross-party agreement than apparent at first sight.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 22 October 2012
Keywords: public service pension reform, UK, fairness, pension outcomes, average salary schemes
Organisations: Sociology, Social Policy & Criminology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 344857
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/344857
ISSN: 1474-7464
PURE UUID: e8fc8c92-0a68-44d4-9624-db0dc1aae30b

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Nov 2012 12:35
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:50

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×