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Spatial layout of retail waste logistics – the case for localised treatment

Spatial layout of retail waste logistics – the case for localised treatment
Spatial layout of retail waste logistics – the case for localised treatment
In recent years, the spatial layout of waste logistics in the retail sector has presented significant changes, as a result of legislative mandates and environmental concerns raised by the increased use of packaging and hazardous materials by retailers. The enactment of new legislation has affected producers and distributors by placing them responsible for the collection, treatment and recovery of hazardous waste. This has had direct impacts on the type, number and location of treatment/disposal facilities and the design, planning and management of the associated logistics networks.

This project investigates current trends in waste supply-chain configurations, using a substantial database of logistics operations compiled from 92 businesses in a shopping centre. The aim is to develop an origin-destination inventory in order to quantify the considerable transport and environmental footprint currently associated with retail waste logistics. Through selected case studies, this paper investigates the scope for coordinated collection strategies across supply-chains potentially using either local treatment facilities or an under-examination sub-urban consolidation centre intended to accommodate deliveries destined for the businesses in the shopping centre
Triantafyllou, Maria
504722fe-859f-4a92-9512-b87dceb795bb
Triantafyllou, Maria
504722fe-859f-4a92-9512-b87dceb795bb

Triantafyllou, Maria (2011) Spatial layout of retail waste logistics – the case for localised treatment. Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers Postgraduate Mid-Term Conference. 01 - 03 Apr 2011.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

In recent years, the spatial layout of waste logistics in the retail sector has presented significant changes, as a result of legislative mandates and environmental concerns raised by the increased use of packaging and hazardous materials by retailers. The enactment of new legislation has affected producers and distributors by placing them responsible for the collection, treatment and recovery of hazardous waste. This has had direct impacts on the type, number and location of treatment/disposal facilities and the design, planning and management of the associated logistics networks.

This project investigates current trends in waste supply-chain configurations, using a substantial database of logistics operations compiled from 92 businesses in a shopping centre. The aim is to develop an origin-destination inventory in order to quantify the considerable transport and environmental footprint currently associated with retail waste logistics. Through selected case studies, this paper investigates the scope for coordinated collection strategies across supply-chains potentially using either local treatment facilities or an under-examination sub-urban consolidation centre intended to accommodate deliveries destined for the businesses in the shopping centre

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More information

Published date: April 2011
Venue - Dates: Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers Postgraduate Mid-Term Conference, 2011-04-01 - 2011-04-03
Organisations: Transportation Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 344904
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/344904
PURE UUID: 0e9cdc6d-ce97-4475-999c-d6766d29c0a4

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Date deposited: 17 Jan 2014 08:44
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 05:13

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