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Who cares and how much: exploring the determinants of co-residential informal care

Who cares and how much: exploring the determinants of co-residential informal care
Who cares and how much: exploring the determinants of co-residential informal care
Abstract The importance of informal care provided inside the household (co-residential care) is widely acknowledged in policy circles. However, the factors that determine the likelihood and scale of provision are not fully understood. A two-part model (2PM) is used to investigate both participation and levels of provision. Random effects dynamic panel specifications are employed. Results show that co-residential informal care competes with other time demanding activities, such as childcare and employment. Wealthier individuals are less likely to be caregivers, whereas wealthier households have a higher tendency towards caregiving. Evidence of both substitution and complementarity is found between formal and informal care. Informal care and health status are significantly related, with carers more likely to report worse General Health Questionnaire scores than non-carers. Finally, significant dynamic effects are observed with the continuance of the provision of informal care being more likely than the initiation of such activity, while heavy commitment in the past increases the hours provided in the current period.
1569-5239
283-303
Mentzakis, Emmanouil
c0922185-18c7-49c2-a659-8ee6d89b5d74
McNamee, Paul
ebb7a998-46dd-42e1-9579-53e48cf3350b
Ryan, Mandy
92290d80-9a03-4b84-a695-9b3573319e52
Mentzakis, Emmanouil
c0922185-18c7-49c2-a659-8ee6d89b5d74
McNamee, Paul
ebb7a998-46dd-42e1-9579-53e48cf3350b
Ryan, Mandy
92290d80-9a03-4b84-a695-9b3573319e52

Mentzakis, Emmanouil, McNamee, Paul and Ryan, Mandy (2009) Who cares and how much: exploring the determinants of co-residential informal care. Review of Economics of the Household, 7 (3), 283-303. (doi:10.1007/s11150-008-9047-0).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Abstract The importance of informal care provided inside the household (co-residential care) is widely acknowledged in policy circles. However, the factors that determine the likelihood and scale of provision are not fully understood. A two-part model (2PM) is used to investigate both participation and levels of provision. Random effects dynamic panel specifications are employed. Results show that co-residential informal care competes with other time demanding activities, such as childcare and employment. Wealthier individuals are less likely to be caregivers, whereas wealthier households have a higher tendency towards caregiving. Evidence of both substitution and complementarity is found between formal and informal care. Informal care and health status are significantly related, with carers more likely to report worse General Health Questionnaire scores than non-carers. Finally, significant dynamic effects are observed with the continuance of the provision of informal care being more likely than the initiation of such activity, while heavy commitment in the past increases the hours provided in the current period.

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Published date: 2009
Organisations: Economics

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 345209
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/345209
ISSN: 1569-5239
PURE UUID: 07aaf973-983e-4775-bda4-55f1d774b522
ORCID for Emmanouil Mentzakis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1761-209X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Nov 2012 09:53
Last modified: 29 Oct 2019 01:40

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