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Evaluating the clinical appropiatenes of nurses' prescribing practice: method development and findings from an expert panel analysis

Evaluating the clinical appropiatenes of nurses' prescribing practice: method development and findings from an expert panel analysis
Evaluating the clinical appropiatenes of nurses' prescribing practice: method development and findings from an expert panel analysis
BACKGROUND: The number of nurses independently prescribing medicines in England is rising steadily. There had been no attempt systematically to evaluate the clinical appropriateness of nurses' prescribing decisions.

AIMS: (i) To establish a method of assessing the clinical appropriateness of nurses' prescribing decisions; (ii) to evaluate the prescribing decisions of a sample of nurses, using this method.

METHOD: A modified version of the Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI) was developed, piloted and subsequently used by seven medical prescribing experts to rate transcripts of 12 nurse prescriber consultations selected from a larger database of 118 audio-recorded consultations collected as part of a national evaluation. Experts were also able to give written qualitative comments on each of the MAI dimensions applied to each of the consultations.

ANALYSIS: Experts' ratings were analysed using descriptive statistics. Qualitative comments were subjected to a process of content analysis to identify themes within and across both MAI items and consultations.

RESULTS: Experts' application of the modified MAI to transcripts of nurse prescriber consultations demonstrated validity and feasibility as a method of assessing the clinical appropriateness of nurses' prescribing decisions. In the majority of assessments made by the expert panel, nurses' prescribing decisions were rated as clinically appropriate on all nine items in the MAI.

CONCLUSION: A valid and feasible method of assessing the clinical appropriateness of nurses' prescribing practice has been developed using a modified MAI and transcripts of audio-recorded consultations sent to a panel of prescribing experts. Prescribing nurses in this study were generally considered to be making clinically appropriate prescribing decisions. This approach to measuring prescribing appropriateness could be used as part of quality assurance in routine practice, as a method of identifying continuing professional development needs, or in future research as the expansion of non-medical prescribing continues.

2044-5415
415-421
Latter, Sue
83f100a4-95ec-4f2e-99a5-186095de2f3b
Maben, Jill
3240b527-420c-498e-9f66-557b96561f40
Myall, Michelle
0604ba0f-75c2-4783-9afe-aa54bf81513f
Young, Amanda J.
6bb7aa9c-776b-4bdd-be4e-cf67abd05652
Latter, Sue
83f100a4-95ec-4f2e-99a5-186095de2f3b
Maben, Jill
3240b527-420c-498e-9f66-557b96561f40
Myall, Michelle
0604ba0f-75c2-4783-9afe-aa54bf81513f
Young, Amanda J.
6bb7aa9c-776b-4bdd-be4e-cf67abd05652

Latter, Sue, Maben, Jill, Myall, Michelle and Young, Amanda J. (2007) Evaluating the clinical appropiatenes of nurses' prescribing practice: method development and findings from an expert panel analysis. BMJ Quality and Safety, 16 (6), 415-421. (doi:10.1136/qshc.2005.017038). (PMID:18055884)

Record type: Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The number of nurses independently prescribing medicines in England is rising steadily. There had been no attempt systematically to evaluate the clinical appropriateness of nurses' prescribing decisions.

AIMS: (i) To establish a method of assessing the clinical appropriateness of nurses' prescribing decisions; (ii) to evaluate the prescribing decisions of a sample of nurses, using this method.

METHOD: A modified version of the Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI) was developed, piloted and subsequently used by seven medical prescribing experts to rate transcripts of 12 nurse prescriber consultations selected from a larger database of 118 audio-recorded consultations collected as part of a national evaluation. Experts were also able to give written qualitative comments on each of the MAI dimensions applied to each of the consultations.

ANALYSIS: Experts' ratings were analysed using descriptive statistics. Qualitative comments were subjected to a process of content analysis to identify themes within and across both MAI items and consultations.

RESULTS: Experts' application of the modified MAI to transcripts of nurse prescriber consultations demonstrated validity and feasibility as a method of assessing the clinical appropriateness of nurses' prescribing decisions. In the majority of assessments made by the expert panel, nurses' prescribing decisions were rated as clinically appropriate on all nine items in the MAI.

CONCLUSION: A valid and feasible method of assessing the clinical appropriateness of nurses' prescribing practice has been developed using a modified MAI and transcripts of audio-recorded consultations sent to a panel of prescribing experts. Prescribing nurses in this study were generally considered to be making clinically appropriate prescribing decisions. This approach to measuring prescribing appropriateness could be used as part of quality assurance in routine practice, as a method of identifying continuing professional development needs, or in future research as the expansion of non-medical prescribing continues.

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Published date: December 2007
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 345299
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/345299
ISSN: 2044-5415
PURE UUID: 903aaf00-8d4d-4d1e-ae0b-9922d721c5d6
ORCID for Sue Latter: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0973-0512
ORCID for Michelle Myall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8733-7412
ORCID for Amanda J. Young: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1486-5561

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Date deposited: 16 Nov 2012 11:16
Last modified: 19 Nov 2019 01:51

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