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Why do the young and educated in LDCs concentrate in large cities? Evidence from migration data

Why do the young and educated in LDCs concentrate in large cities? Evidence from migration data
Why do the young and educated in LDCs concentrate in large cities? Evidence from migration data
Do the young and educated in LDCs have a greater preference to locate in big cities? If so, this may help to explain how cities spatially concentrate the educated and young, and why the rising share of these workers in many LDCs may contribute to city growth. This paper explores migration flows into and out of Egypt's three largest cities. We study whether the higher shares of such workers in cities arise because these workers perceive relatively greater benefits from living in cities, given relative urban/rural wage rates, or because the relative demand for these workers rises with city size.
0013-0427
39-67
McCormick, Barry
6030c745-bb61-4e93-ab8f-91e676281e08
Wahba, Jackline
03ae9304-c329-40c6-9bfc-d91cfa9e7164
McCormick, Barry
6030c745-bb61-4e93-ab8f-91e676281e08
Wahba, Jackline
03ae9304-c329-40c6-9bfc-d91cfa9e7164

McCormick, Barry and Wahba, Jackline (2005) Why do the young and educated in LDCs concentrate in large cities? Evidence from migration data. Economica, 72 (285), 39-67. (doi:10.1111/j.0013-0427.2005.00401.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Do the young and educated in LDCs have a greater preference to locate in big cities? If so, this may help to explain how cities spatially concentrate the educated and young, and why the rising share of these workers in many LDCs may contribute to city growth. This paper explores migration flows into and out of Egypt's three largest cities. We study whether the higher shares of such workers in cities arise because these workers perceive relatively greater benefits from living in cities, given relative urban/rural wage rates, or because the relative demand for these workers rises with city size.

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Published date: 2005

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 34544
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/34544
ISSN: 0013-0427
PURE UUID: ef283281-fc44-41f6-be86-ba2fd84c552b
ORCID for Jackline Wahba: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0002-3443

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Date deposited: 16 May 2006
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:18

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Contributors

Author: Barry McCormick
Author: Jackline Wahba ORCID iD

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