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Temperature effects on platinum single-crystal electrodes

Temperature effects on platinum single-crystal electrodes
Temperature effects on platinum single-crystal electrodes
This work reviews three different approaches for the study of temperature effects on the platinum single-crystal | solution interphase. First, the method of analysis of temperature-dependent voltammetric data with the help of a generalized isotherm is described and illustrated for the case of adsorbed hydrogen and OH species on Pt(111) in 0.1 M HClO4. This method of analysis allows a detailed evaluation of the thermodynamic data of charge-transfer adsorbed species, namely, the standard molar Gibbs energy, enthalpy and entropy of adsorption and the magnitude of the lateral interaction between adsorbed species. However, a number of assumptions are involved in the application of a generalized isotherm, namely, the assumption of a Langmuirian configurational term and an arbitrary separation of capacitive and faradaic processes. The second approach described here overcomes these assumptions, since it employs Gibbs thermodynamic equations for interphaces to describe temperature effects on electrosorption processes including those in which charge-transfer is allowed. This approach allows evaluation of the entropy of formation of the interphase, being defined as the difference in entropy of the components of the interphase when they are forming it and when they are in the bulk phases. This method of analysis is illustrated through the evaluation of the entropy of formation of the interphase for Pt(111) in 0.1 M HClO4. Finally, it is shown that temperature effects on interfacial processes can also be studied by means of the application of a fast temperature perturbation. This approach opens the possibility to separate the effect of temperature on the different components of the interphase. The fast temperature perturbation is usually achieved with short laser pulses, and hence the method is called the laser-induced temperature jump method. This approach is illustrated here for the case of Pt(111) in 1 mM HClO4 + 0.1 M KClO4, and it is shown that the corresponding laser-induced transients provide direct evidence on the reorientation of the interfacial water network
1023-1935
271-280
Garcia-Araez, Nuria
9358a0f9-309c-495e-b6bf-da985ad81c37
Climent, Victor
c3ecab58-edb5-4055-8fa0-c0aef0fc60a4
Feliu, Juan M.
f2a5301a-2886-4f27-b614-99a74a0a9a28
Garcia-Araez, Nuria
9358a0f9-309c-495e-b6bf-da985ad81c37
Climent, Victor
c3ecab58-edb5-4055-8fa0-c0aef0fc60a4
Feliu, Juan M.
f2a5301a-2886-4f27-b614-99a74a0a9a28

Garcia-Araez, Nuria, Climent, Victor and Feliu, Juan M. (2012) Temperature effects on platinum single-crystal electrodes. Russian Journal of Electrochemistry, 48 (3), 271-280. (doi:10.1134/S1023193512030044).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This work reviews three different approaches for the study of temperature effects on the platinum single-crystal | solution interphase. First, the method of analysis of temperature-dependent voltammetric data with the help of a generalized isotherm is described and illustrated for the case of adsorbed hydrogen and OH species on Pt(111) in 0.1 M HClO4. This method of analysis allows a detailed evaluation of the thermodynamic data of charge-transfer adsorbed species, namely, the standard molar Gibbs energy, enthalpy and entropy of adsorption and the magnitude of the lateral interaction between adsorbed species. However, a number of assumptions are involved in the application of a generalized isotherm, namely, the assumption of a Langmuirian configurational term and an arbitrary separation of capacitive and faradaic processes. The second approach described here overcomes these assumptions, since it employs Gibbs thermodynamic equations for interphaces to describe temperature effects on electrosorption processes including those in which charge-transfer is allowed. This approach allows evaluation of the entropy of formation of the interphase, being defined as the difference in entropy of the components of the interphase when they are forming it and when they are in the bulk phases. This method of analysis is illustrated through the evaluation of the entropy of formation of the interphase for Pt(111) in 0.1 M HClO4. Finally, it is shown that temperature effects on interfacial processes can also be studied by means of the application of a fast temperature perturbation. This approach opens the possibility to separate the effect of temperature on the different components of the interphase. The fast temperature perturbation is usually achieved with short laser pulses, and hence the method is called the laser-induced temperature jump method. This approach is illustrated here for the case of Pt(111) in 1 mM HClO4 + 0.1 M KClO4, and it is shown that the corresponding laser-induced transients provide direct evidence on the reorientation of the interfacial water network

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Published date: March 2012
Organisations: Chemistry

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 345657
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/345657
ISSN: 1023-1935
PURE UUID: 6cc8e9ea-ba99-415f-92ee-3604418ec104
ORCID for Nuria Garcia-Araez: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9095-2379

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Date deposited: 28 Nov 2012 09:50
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:39

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