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Shifting baselines in Antarctic ecosystems; ecophysiological response to warming in Lissarca miliaris at Signy Island, Antarctica

Shifting baselines in Antarctic ecosystems; ecophysiological response to warming in Lissarca miliaris at Signy Island, Antarctica
Shifting baselines in Antarctic ecosystems; ecophysiological response to warming in Lissarca miliaris at Signy Island, Antarctica
The Antarctic Peninsula has experienced a rapid increase in atmospheric temperature over the last 50 years. Whether or not marine organisms thriving in this cold stenothermal environment are able to cope with warming is of concern. Here, we present changes to the growth and shell characteristics of the ecologically important, small and short lived brooding bivalve Lissarca miliaris from Signy Island, Antarctica. Using material collected from the 1970’s to the present day, we show an increase in growth rate and adult shell deterioration accompanied by a decrease in offspring size, associated with an increase in annual average temperatures. Critical changes to the bivalve’s ecology seen today evidence the problem of a shift in baseline since the onset of warming recorded in Antarctica. These small bivalves are demonstrating ecophysiological responses to subtle warming that, provided warming continues, could soon surpass a physiological tipping point, adding to warming associated threats such as increased predatory pressure and ocean acidification.
1932-6203
e53477
Reed, Adam
ec734ee2-469c-4259-91d6-4abcfbe65e3b
Thatje, Sven
f1011fe3-1048-40c0-97c1-e93b796e6533
Linse, Katrin
74d7ddc0-74a1-4777-ac1d-3f39ae1935ad
Reed, Adam
ec734ee2-469c-4259-91d6-4abcfbe65e3b
Thatje, Sven
f1011fe3-1048-40c0-97c1-e93b796e6533
Linse, Katrin
74d7ddc0-74a1-4777-ac1d-3f39ae1935ad

Reed, Adam, Thatje, Sven and Linse, Katrin (2012) Shifting baselines in Antarctic ecosystems; ecophysiological response to warming in Lissarca miliaris at Signy Island, Antarctica. PLoS ONE, 7 (12), e53477. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0053477).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The Antarctic Peninsula has experienced a rapid increase in atmospheric temperature over the last 50 years. Whether or not marine organisms thriving in this cold stenothermal environment are able to cope with warming is of concern. Here, we present changes to the growth and shell characteristics of the ecologically important, small and short lived brooding bivalve Lissarca miliaris from Signy Island, Antarctica. Using material collected from the 1970’s to the present day, we show an increase in growth rate and adult shell deterioration accompanied by a decrease in offspring size, associated with an increase in annual average temperatures. Critical changes to the bivalve’s ecology seen today evidence the problem of a shift in baseline since the onset of warming recorded in Antarctica. These small bivalves are demonstrating ecophysiological responses to subtle warming that, provided warming continues, could soon surpass a physiological tipping point, adding to warming associated threats such as increased predatory pressure and ocean acidification.

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Published date: 28 December 2012
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science, Ocean Biochemistry & Ecosystems

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 345755
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/345755
ISSN: 1932-6203
PURE UUID: ddefa388-cf6b-438b-8cf1-30f7c8377f7a
ORCID for Adam Reed: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2200-5067

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Nov 2012 16:59
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 03:30

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Contributors

Author: Adam Reed ORCID iD
Author: Sven Thatje
Author: Katrin Linse

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