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The uneven impact of different life domains on the wellbeing of migrants

The uneven impact of different life domains on the wellbeing of migrants
The uneven impact of different life domains on the wellbeing of migrants
Life satisfaction and motives for migration are both complex entanglements, reflecting multiple desires and experiences. The aim of this paper is to show that a focussed analysis of satisfaction with particular domains of life can lend support to the claim that residential migration is not only a life stressor but also a positive means leading to enduring improvements in individual satisfaction. Using the British Household Panel Survey we examine overall life satisfaction and satisfaction in various life domains such as housing, job, social life, household income, spouse and health, both prior to and after moving. A temporal pattern of migrants’ satisfaction for a number of years before and after the move is derived employing a fixed-effects model. Our results reveal that moving increases housing satisfaction considerably. Despite some decrease over time, five years after migration housing satisfaction is still significantly higher than it was initially. The positive effect of migration on housing satisfaction is much stronger and endures longer for those with a sustained desire to move before migration. Changes in satisfaction with other life domains are much less pronounced and no lasting improvements in satisfaction are observed for them.
2042-4116
26
University of Southampton
Findlay, Allan M.
4c7e94d1-f1bc-4eb9-a22e-68d9070407d4
Nowok, Beata
3f24a8c7-8d5a-4729-aeeb-b54b990c41a0
McGowan, Teresa
4524e894-04de-4822-8508-f4b966e12ae2
Findlay, Allan M.
4c7e94d1-f1bc-4eb9-a22e-68d9070407d4
Nowok, Beata
3f24a8c7-8d5a-4729-aeeb-b54b990c41a0
McGowan, Teresa
4524e894-04de-4822-8508-f4b966e12ae2

Findlay, Allan M. and Nowok, Beata , McGowan, Teresa (ed.) (2012) The uneven impact of different life domains on the wellbeing of migrants (ESRC Centre for Population Change Working Paper Series, 26) Southampton, GB. University of Southampton

Record type: Monograph (Working Paper)

Abstract

Life satisfaction and motives for migration are both complex entanglements, reflecting multiple desires and experiences. The aim of this paper is to show that a focussed analysis of satisfaction with particular domains of life can lend support to the claim that residential migration is not only a life stressor but also a positive means leading to enduring improvements in individual satisfaction. Using the British Household Panel Survey we examine overall life satisfaction and satisfaction in various life domains such as housing, job, social life, household income, spouse and health, both prior to and after moving. A temporal pattern of migrants’ satisfaction for a number of years before and after the move is derived employing a fixed-effects model. Our results reveal that moving increases housing satisfaction considerably. Despite some decrease over time, five years after migration housing satisfaction is still significantly higher than it was initially. The positive effect of migration on housing satisfaction is much stronger and endures longer for those with a sustained desire to move before migration. Changes in satisfaction with other life domains are much less pronounced and no lasting improvements in satisfaction are observed for them.

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Published date: 1 August 2012
Organisations: Social Sciences, Centre for Population Change

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 345836
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/345836
ISSN: 2042-4116
PURE UUID: 3dddd1c7-7c1c-42cb-93ee-8ec0b598b763

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Date deposited: 05 Dec 2012 15:08
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 05:07

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