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Barriers to passenger rail use: a review of the evidence

Barriers to passenger rail use: a review of the evidence
Barriers to passenger rail use: a review of the evidence
Research has shown that even when rail travel is the most cost-effective mode of transport for a particular journey, many travellers will still choose other modes. This indicates the existence of non-financial barriers to rail use, and this paper reviews the evidence on the importance of such barriers, focusing particularly on the UK but also considering research from other countries. A total of 37 distinct barriers were identified, and these can be divided into “hard”, “soft” and “complementary” factors. Travellers are unlikely to consider these barriers individually, viewing them instead as a package, which can make it difficult to identify which barriers are most significant. In many cases, all barriers which exist for a particular traveller will need to be addressed before mode shift occurs. After considering the relative importance of the different barriers, the paper concludes by making some suggestions as to the most effective ways in which these barriers can be overcome and mode shift to rail achieved. This has key implications for transport policy, as it can inform the targeting of the limited funds available to influence travel behaviour and increase the sustainability of travel patterns.

rail travel, mode shift, perceptions, policy packages, car dependence
0144-1647
675-696
Blainey, Simon
ee6198e5-1f89-4f9b-be8e-52cc10e8b3bb
Hickford, Adrian
55d34672-b7bb-47d4-97a6-095304c429de
Preston, John
ef81c42e-c896-4768-92d1-052662037f0b
Blainey, Simon
ee6198e5-1f89-4f9b-be8e-52cc10e8b3bb
Hickford, Adrian
55d34672-b7bb-47d4-97a6-095304c429de
Preston, John
ef81c42e-c896-4768-92d1-052662037f0b

Blainey, Simon, Hickford, Adrian and Preston, John (2012) Barriers to passenger rail use: a review of the evidence. Transport Reviews, 32 (6), 675-696. (doi:10.1080/01441647.2012.743489).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Research has shown that even when rail travel is the most cost-effective mode of transport for a particular journey, many travellers will still choose other modes. This indicates the existence of non-financial barriers to rail use, and this paper reviews the evidence on the importance of such barriers, focusing particularly on the UK but also considering research from other countries. A total of 37 distinct barriers were identified, and these can be divided into “hard”, “soft” and “complementary” factors. Travellers are unlikely to consider these barriers individually, viewing them instead as a package, which can make it difficult to identify which barriers are most significant. In many cases, all barriers which exist for a particular traveller will need to be addressed before mode shift occurs. After considering the relative importance of the different barriers, the paper concludes by making some suggestions as to the most effective ways in which these barriers can be overcome and mode shift to rail achieved. This has key implications for transport policy, as it can inform the targeting of the limited funds available to influence travel behaviour and increase the sustainability of travel patterns.

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More information

Published date: 19 November 2012
Keywords: rail travel, mode shift, perceptions, policy packages, car dependence
Organisations: Transportation Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 345885
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/345885
ISSN: 0144-1647
PURE UUID: 54dc39dd-3c94-4a45-85ed-9a63e34ff5ec
ORCID for Simon Blainey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4249-8110
ORCID for John Preston: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6866-049X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Dec 2012 15:02
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:41

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Contributors

Author: Simon Blainey ORCID iD
Author: Adrian Hickford
Author: John Preston ORCID iD

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