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Pile heat exchangers: thermal behaviour and interactions

Pile heat exchangers: thermal behaviour and interactions
Pile heat exchangers: thermal behaviour and interactions
Thermal piles – that is structural foundation piles also used as heat exchangers as part of a ground energy system – are increasingly being adopted for their contribution to more sustainable energy strategies for new buildings. Despite over a quarter of a century having passed since the installation of the first thermal piles in northern Europe, uncertainties regarding their behaviour remain. This paper identifies the key factors which influence the heat transfer and thermal–mechanical interactions of such piles. In terms of heat output, pile aspect ratio is identified as an important parameter controlling the overall thermal performance. Temperature changes in the concrete and surrounding ground during thermal pile operation will lead to additional concrete stresses and displacements within the pile–soil system. Consequently designers must ensure that temperatures remain within acceptable limits, while the pile geotechnical analysis should demonstrate that any adverse thermal stresses are within design safety factors and that any additional displacements do not affect the serviceability of the structure
1353-2618
178-196
Loveridge, F.A.
fb5b7ad9-d1b8-40d3-894b-bccedf0e8a77
Powrie, W.
600c3f02-00f8-4486-ae4b-b4fc8ec77c3c
Loveridge, F.A.
fb5b7ad9-d1b8-40d3-894b-bccedf0e8a77
Powrie, W.
600c3f02-00f8-4486-ae4b-b4fc8ec77c3c

Loveridge, F.A. and Powrie, W. (2013) Pile heat exchangers: thermal behaviour and interactions. Proceedings of the ICE - Geotechnical Engineering, 166 (2), 178-196. (doi:10.1680/geng.11.00042).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Thermal piles – that is structural foundation piles also used as heat exchangers as part of a ground energy system – are increasingly being adopted for their contribution to more sustainable energy strategies for new buildings. Despite over a quarter of a century having passed since the installation of the first thermal piles in northern Europe, uncertainties regarding their behaviour remain. This paper identifies the key factors which influence the heat transfer and thermal–mechanical interactions of such piles. In terms of heat output, pile aspect ratio is identified as an important parameter controlling the overall thermal performance. Temperature changes in the concrete and surrounding ground during thermal pile operation will lead to additional concrete stresses and displacements within the pile–soil system. Consequently designers must ensure that temperatures remain within acceptable limits, while the pile geotechnical analysis should demonstrate that any adverse thermal stresses are within design safety factors and that any additional displacements do not affect the serviceability of the structure

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Published date: 5 April 2013
Organisations: Civil Maritime & Env. Eng & Sci Unit

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 346102
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/346102
ISSN: 1353-2618
PURE UUID: 65cd63f2-0db2-44a2-8e20-f9a71f6e6d7c
ORCID for W. Powrie: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2271-0826

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Dec 2012 10:03
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:06

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Contributors

Author: F.A. Loveridge
Author: W. Powrie ORCID iD

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