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Bio-inspired aquatic flight propulsion system for agile and maneuverable underwater vehicles

Bio-inspired aquatic flight propulsion system for agile and maneuverable underwater vehicles
Bio-inspired aquatic flight propulsion system for agile and maneuverable underwater vehicles
Modern unmanned underwater vehicles generally use one of two methods for manoeuvring; thrusters or control surfaces. These control methods each have a limited range of speeds over which they can operate efficiently. Manoeuvring control is often separate from the propulsion system, increasing vehicle weight and drag. By comparison, many animals possess only one set of propulsors which is used for both propulsion and manoeuvring. There are many types of marine animal locomotion, aquatic flight stands out for having both high speed and very good manoeuvrability and is the focus of the present research. The investigation uses a combination of animal video motion analysis, mathematical modelling and experimentation. Video motion analysis was used to provide data on the actual motion made by a penguin wing during swimming motion. Of particular interest is the yaw motion of the wing, however the ability to accurately capture this axis of motion was hindered by the video quality. The mathematical modelling concentrated on the Blade Element Theory (BET). The model was used to assess the loads generated by the motion of a wing section. In additional to the hydrodynamic lift and drag forces, the BET model also modelled added mass forces and Kramer effect. However, the result the model still under predicted the thrust coefficient suggesting the thrust is supplemented by other hydrodynamic effects. The BET model was also used for analysis of three axis actuation where it found the yaw motion will reduce thrust coefficient. Finally a three axis experiment has been designed with inspiration from the motion observed from swimming penguins and the experiment will be used to validate the forces from the mathematical model
Man, S.K.
2334efaa-c23a-4b1e-94b7-6c1154b2208d
Phillips, A.B.
f565b1da-6881-4e2a-8729-c082b869028f
Boyd, S.W.
bcbdefe0-5acf-4d6a-8a16-f4abf7c78b10
Blake, J.I.R.
6afa420d-0936-4acc-861b-36885406c891
Griffiths, G.
2887c3c7-95f2-4834-b3f6-0284344d3580
Man, S.K.
2334efaa-c23a-4b1e-94b7-6c1154b2208d
Phillips, A.B.
f565b1da-6881-4e2a-8729-c082b869028f
Boyd, S.W.
bcbdefe0-5acf-4d6a-8a16-f4abf7c78b10
Blake, J.I.R.
6afa420d-0936-4acc-861b-36885406c891
Griffiths, G.
2887c3c7-95f2-4834-b3f6-0284344d3580

Man, S.K., Phillips, A.B., Boyd, S.W., Blake, J.I.R. and Griffiths, G. (2012) Bio-inspired aquatic flight propulsion system for agile and maneuverable underwater vehicles. IEEE Oceans 2012, Yeosu, Korea, Republic of. 20 - 23 May 2012. 10 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Modern unmanned underwater vehicles generally use one of two methods for manoeuvring; thrusters or control surfaces. These control methods each have a limited range of speeds over which they can operate efficiently. Manoeuvring control is often separate from the propulsion system, increasing vehicle weight and drag. By comparison, many animals possess only one set of propulsors which is used for both propulsion and manoeuvring. There are many types of marine animal locomotion, aquatic flight stands out for having both high speed and very good manoeuvrability and is the focus of the present research. The investigation uses a combination of animal video motion analysis, mathematical modelling and experimentation. Video motion analysis was used to provide data on the actual motion made by a penguin wing during swimming motion. Of particular interest is the yaw motion of the wing, however the ability to accurately capture this axis of motion was hindered by the video quality. The mathematical modelling concentrated on the Blade Element Theory (BET). The model was used to assess the loads generated by the motion of a wing section. In additional to the hydrodynamic lift and drag forces, the BET model also modelled added mass forces and Kramer effect. However, the result the model still under predicted the thrust coefficient suggesting the thrust is supplemented by other hydrodynamic effects. The BET model was also used for analysis of three axis actuation where it found the yaw motion will reduce thrust coefficient. Finally a three axis experiment has been designed with inspiration from the motion observed from swimming penguins and the experiment will be used to validate the forces from the mathematical model

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More information

Published date: 21 May 2012
Venue - Dates: IEEE Oceans 2012, Yeosu, Korea, Republic of, 2012-05-20 - 2012-05-23
Organisations: Southampton Education School, Engineering Science Unit, Ocean Technology and Engineering, Fluid Structure Interactions Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 346186
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/346186
PURE UUID: 2d072c9b-adfb-4989-98c2-853281ee7507
ORCID for A.B. Phillips: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3234-8506
ORCID for J.I.R. Blake: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5291-8233

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Dec 2012 08:45
Last modified: 11 Dec 2021 04:02

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Contributors

Author: S.K. Man
Author: A.B. Phillips ORCID iD
Author: S.W. Boyd
Author: J.I.R. Blake ORCID iD
Author: G. Griffiths

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