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Editorial. The role of business and industry in climate management after Durban

Editorial. The role of business and industry in climate management after Durban
Editorial. The role of business and industry in climate management after Durban
On one level, it could be concluded that the 17th COP at Durban saw the same quarrelling, lack of movement and national protectionism that has plagued recent COPs. A cynic might claim that the overriding message was that “a plan was made to make a plan” and that no real progress was made.

However, a more balanced conclusion might be that we are making slow but steady progress to address the long-term challenge of climate change collectively and comprehensively. The were two key positive messages to emerge from the meeting:

- Driven by the EU countries, a pathway towards an international climate regime was agreed. A legally-binding agreement, based upon sound science, covering both developed and developing countries will be negotiated by 2015, which would cover post-2020 emissions targets and actions.

- Real progress was evident on some key issues, including technological advances, REDD+ and adaptation.

Conversely, the key negative messages were that:

- There was little progress on how we might close the gap between countries’ emissions levels and what is required to maintain the planet within 2°C of warming.

- Proposed funding levels are probably too low to facilitate the proper implementation of the Cancun Agreements, especially in terms of assisting developing nations to deal with the effects of climate change.

- There is still no agreed common accounting framework for carbon emissions; without this, meeting the “within 2°C goal” will be extremely difficult.
1758-3004
431-433
Williams, I.D.
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22
Coello, Jon
7192f0a9-5f88-4fa2-b414-67dc9cebb616
Kemp, Simon
942b35c0-3584-4ca1-bf9e-5f07790d6e36
McMurtry, Erin
fd88642c-1bf1-4a47-b47a-06fb389fc22f
Turner, David
39dc4dc8-88b4-4950-8bbd-c647ff110ec9
Wright, Laurence
e57bb51d-a89a-4d49-aaa5-0fe1c6457329
Williams, I.D.
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22
Coello, Jon
7192f0a9-5f88-4fa2-b414-67dc9cebb616
Kemp, Simon
942b35c0-3584-4ca1-bf9e-5f07790d6e36
McMurtry, Erin
fd88642c-1bf1-4a47-b47a-06fb389fc22f
Turner, David
39dc4dc8-88b4-4950-8bbd-c647ff110ec9
Wright, Laurence
e57bb51d-a89a-4d49-aaa5-0fe1c6457329

Williams, I.D., Coello, Jon, Kemp, Simon, McMurtry, Erin, Turner, David and Wright, Laurence (2012) Editorial. The role of business and industry in climate management after Durban. Carbon Management, 3 (5), 431-433. (doi:10.4155/CMT.12.51).

Record type: Article

Abstract

On one level, it could be concluded that the 17th COP at Durban saw the same quarrelling, lack of movement and national protectionism that has plagued recent COPs. A cynic might claim that the overriding message was that “a plan was made to make a plan” and that no real progress was made.

However, a more balanced conclusion might be that we are making slow but steady progress to address the long-term challenge of climate change collectively and comprehensively. The were two key positive messages to emerge from the meeting:

- Driven by the EU countries, a pathway towards an international climate regime was agreed. A legally-binding agreement, based upon sound science, covering both developed and developing countries will be negotiated by 2015, which would cover post-2020 emissions targets and actions.

- Real progress was evident on some key issues, including technological advances, REDD+ and adaptation.

Conversely, the key negative messages were that:

- There was little progress on how we might close the gap between countries’ emissions levels and what is required to maintain the planet within 2°C of warming.

- Proposed funding levels are probably too low to facilitate the proper implementation of the Cancun Agreements, especially in terms of assisting developing nations to deal with the effects of climate change.

- There is still no agreed common accounting framework for carbon emissions; without this, meeting the “within 2°C goal” will be extremely difficult.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: October 2012
Organisations: Centre for Environmental Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 346369
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/346369
ISSN: 1758-3004
PURE UUID: e235fa16-9f4a-444e-b023-a858882b2e68
ORCID for I.D. Williams: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0121-1219

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Jan 2013 14:16
Last modified: 29 Oct 2019 01:50

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