The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Social connectedness and generalized trust: a longitudinal perspective

Social connectedness and generalized trust: a longitudinal perspective
Social connectedness and generalized trust: a longitudinal perspective
Social, or ’generalized‘, trust refers to beliefs that people hold about how other people in society will in general act towards them. Can people in general be trusted? Or must one be careful in dealing with people? Research on the antecedents of social trust has typically relied on cross-sectional regression estimators to evaluate putative causes. Our contention is that much of this research over-estimates the importance of many of these causes because of the failure to account for unmeasured confounding influences. In this paper we use longitudinal data to assess the causal status of a particularly prominent mooted cause of trust: the degree to which individuals are socially integrated via formal membership of civic organisations and through friendship networks. We fit a range of regression estimators to repeated measures data from the UK for the period 1998 to 2008. Our results show little support for the widely held view that social trust results from integration within social networks, of either a formal or an informal nature
19
University of Essesx
Sturgis, Patrick
b9f6b40c-50d2-4117-805a-577b501d0b3c
Patulny, Roger
ea2ab054-bd0c-48a1-8f91-33fca7614823
Allum, Nick
849dfc6c-00ce-4383-bb5c-4d67985f5576
Buscha, Franz
425351f5-9eb4-40fe-b60a-77546e228851
Sturgis, Patrick
b9f6b40c-50d2-4117-805a-577b501d0b3c
Patulny, Roger
ea2ab054-bd0c-48a1-8f91-33fca7614823
Allum, Nick
849dfc6c-00ce-4383-bb5c-4d67985f5576
Buscha, Franz
425351f5-9eb4-40fe-b60a-77546e228851

Sturgis, Patrick, Patulny, Roger, Allum, Nick and Buscha, Franz (2012) Social connectedness and generalized trust: a longitudinal perspective (Institute for Social & Economic Research Working Papers, 19) University of Essesx

Record type: Monograph (Working Paper)

Abstract

Social, or ’generalized‘, trust refers to beliefs that people hold about how other people in society will in general act towards them. Can people in general be trusted? Or must one be careful in dealing with people? Research on the antecedents of social trust has typically relied on cross-sectional regression estimators to evaluate putative causes. Our contention is that much of this research over-estimates the importance of many of these causes because of the failure to account for unmeasured confounding influences. In this paper we use longitudinal data to assess the causal status of a particularly prominent mooted cause of trust: the degree to which individuals are socially integrated via formal membership of civic organisations and through friendship networks. We fit a range of regression estimators to repeated measures data from the UK for the period 1998 to 2008. Our results show little support for the widely held view that social trust results from integration within social networks, of either a formal or an informal nature

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: September 2012
Organisations: Social Statistics & Demography

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 346392
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/346392
PURE UUID: 74b7e7b0-9007-439e-86fe-6346a176b442
ORCID for Patrick Sturgis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1180-3493

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 02 Jan 2013 10:12
Last modified: 15 Jan 2019 01:33

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×