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Risk-avoidant decision making increased by threat of electric shock

Risk-avoidant decision making increased by threat of electric shock
Risk-avoidant decision making increased by threat of electric shock
Threat cues elicit defensive reactions mediated by limbic brain circuitry that is also implicated in risk-sensitive decision making. Building upon research looking at stress effects on decision making, a gambling task was administered to 65 healthy adults, comparing decision making on trials on which a red screen background signalled threat of shocks against trials when shocks could not occur. The threat cues elicited increased electrodermal activity and a sustained decrease in heart rate, consistent with defensive vigilance. The threat condition was associated with risk-avoidant choices, on trials where the risky option involved moderate losses and when choosing between options involving only losses. These effects were not explained by changes in latency. Threat exerts immediate effects on decision making and physiological arousal, biasing subjects towards safer alternatives, potentially through a magnified processing of loss information
0048-5772
1436-1443
Clark, Luke
d0d03564-0462-4056-ab19-b511acc1321b
Li, Ruoran
71a3b045-9dc7-4c5c-bab1-ab5428fba524
Wright, Chelsea
e6732eea-5b3d-4c3b-9aea-b51a5e64899f
Rome, Farima
9a3a1386-ca55-41c3-a87c-500555b90988
Fairchild, Graeme
f99bc911-978e-48c2-9754-c6460666a95f
Dunn, Barnaby
999286c0-4e6e-4a3b-9b49-4c19f9eafd56
Aitken, Michael
05ce3915-1f73-4510-a097-95bbb98c4438
Clark, Luke
d0d03564-0462-4056-ab19-b511acc1321b
Li, Ruoran
71a3b045-9dc7-4c5c-bab1-ab5428fba524
Wright, Chelsea
e6732eea-5b3d-4c3b-9aea-b51a5e64899f
Rome, Farima
9a3a1386-ca55-41c3-a87c-500555b90988
Fairchild, Graeme
f99bc911-978e-48c2-9754-c6460666a95f
Dunn, Barnaby
999286c0-4e6e-4a3b-9b49-4c19f9eafd56
Aitken, Michael
05ce3915-1f73-4510-a097-95bbb98c4438

Clark, Luke, Li, Ruoran, Wright, Chelsea, Rome, Farima, Fairchild, Graeme, Dunn, Barnaby and Aitken, Michael (2012) Risk-avoidant decision making increased by threat of electric shock. Psychophysiology, 49 (10), 1436-1443. (doi:10.1111/j.1469-8986.2012.01454.x). (PMID:22913418)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Threat cues elicit defensive reactions mediated by limbic brain circuitry that is also implicated in risk-sensitive decision making. Building upon research looking at stress effects on decision making, a gambling task was administered to 65 healthy adults, comparing decision making on trials on which a red screen background signalled threat of shocks against trials when shocks could not occur. The threat cues elicited increased electrodermal activity and a sustained decrease in heart rate, consistent with defensive vigilance. The threat condition was associated with risk-avoidant choices, on trials where the risky option involved moderate losses and when choosing between options involving only losses. These effects were not explained by changes in latency. Threat exerts immediate effects on decision making and physiological arousal, biasing subjects towards safer alternatives, potentially through a magnified processing of loss information

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e-pub ahead of print date: 22 August 2012
Published date: October 2012
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 346482
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/346482
ISSN: 0048-5772
PURE UUID: 7ff69b48-a554-4559-9589-ca66289f6483
ORCID for Graeme Fairchild: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7814-9938

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Date deposited: 04 Jan 2013 13:17
Last modified: 18 Nov 2019 20:41

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