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The age-related increase in low-grade systemic inflammation (inflammaging) is not driven by cytomegalovirus infection

The age-related increase in low-grade systemic inflammation (inflammaging) is not driven by cytomegalovirus infection
The age-related increase in low-grade systemic inflammation (inflammaging) is not driven by cytomegalovirus infection
Aging is accompanied by the development of low-grade systemic inflammation, termed 'inflammaging', characterized by raised serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Importantly, inflammaging is implicated in the pathogenesis of several of the major age-related diseases including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and dementia and is associated with increased mortality. The incidence of infection with the persistent herpes virus cytomegalovirus (CMV) also increases with age. Cross-sectional studies have proposed CMV infection as a significant driver of inflammaging, but a definitive case for CMV as a causative agent in inflammaging has not yet been made. We studied longitudinally 249 subjects (153 men, 96 women) who participated in the Hertfordshire Ageing Study at baseline (1993/5, mean age 67·5 years) and at 10 year follow-up. At both times, anthropometric measurements were made and subjects provided blood samples for analysis of inflammatory status and CMV seropositivity. In the cohort as a whole, serum CRP (P < 0·02) and pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF? (P < 0·001) and IL-6 (P < 0·001) were increased between baseline and follow-up sampling whereas levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 were decreased (P < 0·001). These changes to cytokine status over time occurred equally in the 60% of subjects who were seropositive for CMV at baseline and follow-up, the 8% who were CMV negative at baseline but who became CMV positive by the 10 year follow-up, and also in the 32% who were CMV seronegative throughout. We conclude that CMV infection is not a primary causative factor in the age-related increase in systemic inflammation.
aging, cytokines, inflammation
1474-9718
912-915
Bartlett, David B.
ab469b46-fa27-43be-9be2-6b3335082d9b
Firth, Charlotte M.
ec1ff9bf-87fa-45c3-8528-697c5db0c150
Phillips, Anna C.
d007c34d-e3b8-4a33-9608-841383e54e47
Moss, Paul
9b1abef3-0b2f-4cd0-b3be-49629c95bd18
Baylis, D.
81f774ef-9139-48bd-8360-d20ebedaa492
Syddall, Holly E.
a0181a93-8fc3-4998-a996-7963f0128328
Aihie Sayer, A.
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Lord, Janet M.
29f3ed31-5762-4b3f-aca5-3d1049d26830
Bartlett, David B.
ab469b46-fa27-43be-9be2-6b3335082d9b
Firth, Charlotte M.
ec1ff9bf-87fa-45c3-8528-697c5db0c150
Phillips, Anna C.
d007c34d-e3b8-4a33-9608-841383e54e47
Moss, Paul
9b1abef3-0b2f-4cd0-b3be-49629c95bd18
Baylis, D.
81f774ef-9139-48bd-8360-d20ebedaa492
Syddall, Holly E.
a0181a93-8fc3-4998-a996-7963f0128328
Aihie Sayer, A.
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Lord, Janet M.
29f3ed31-5762-4b3f-aca5-3d1049d26830

Bartlett, David B., Firth, Charlotte M., Phillips, Anna C., Moss, Paul, Baylis, D., Syddall, Holly E., Aihie Sayer, A., Cooper, Cyrus and Lord, Janet M. (2012) The age-related increase in low-grade systemic inflammation (inflammaging) is not driven by cytomegalovirus infection. Aging Cell, 11 (5), 912-915. (doi:10.1111/j.1474-9726.2012.00849.x). (PMID:22708923)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aging is accompanied by the development of low-grade systemic inflammation, termed 'inflammaging', characterized by raised serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Importantly, inflammaging is implicated in the pathogenesis of several of the major age-related diseases including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and dementia and is associated with increased mortality. The incidence of infection with the persistent herpes virus cytomegalovirus (CMV) also increases with age. Cross-sectional studies have proposed CMV infection as a significant driver of inflammaging, but a definitive case for CMV as a causative agent in inflammaging has not yet been made. We studied longitudinally 249 subjects (153 men, 96 women) who participated in the Hertfordshire Ageing Study at baseline (1993/5, mean age 67·5 years) and at 10 year follow-up. At both times, anthropometric measurements were made and subjects provided blood samples for analysis of inflammatory status and CMV seropositivity. In the cohort as a whole, serum CRP (P < 0·02) and pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF? (P < 0·001) and IL-6 (P < 0·001) were increased between baseline and follow-up sampling whereas levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 were decreased (P < 0·001). These changes to cytokine status over time occurred equally in the 60% of subjects who were seropositive for CMV at baseline and follow-up, the 8% who were CMV negative at baseline but who became CMV positive by the 10 year follow-up, and also in the 32% who were CMV seronegative throughout. We conclude that CMV infection is not a primary causative factor in the age-related increase in systemic inflammation.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 7 July 2012
Published date: October 2012
Keywords: aging, cytokines, inflammation
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 346497
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/346497
ISSN: 1474-9718
PURE UUID: 468993a2-68a9-487d-839d-1ebe7039452c
ORCID for Holly E. Syddall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0171-0306
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Jan 2013 14:46
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:00

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