The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

New-build studentification: a panacea for balanced communities?

New-build studentification: a panacea for balanced communities?
New-build studentification: a panacea for balanced communities?
Rising concern about the negative impacts of students on “host communities” has triggered debates about the consequences of studentification in the UK. For some commentators, purpose-built student accommodation (PBSA) appears the panacea for studentification, as it offers the potential to reintroduce balance to studentified communities by redistributing student populations in regulated ways. This paper explores this contention, drawing upon focus groups and household surveys conducted in the vicinity of a PBSA development in Brighton (UK). The paper concludes that the location of this development in a densely populated neighbourhood has engendered adverse student / community relations, conflict, feelings of dispossession, and displacement of established local residents. It is asserted that future developments of PBSA should be mindful of these issues and their implications for questions of community cohesion, quality-of-life and belonging in established residential communities. These findings are discussed in relation to debates of age differentials, segregation, and new-build gentrification.
0042-0980
Sage, Joanna
9b9f43a4-6269-4ea4-bd63-2ebfec6bd40a
Smith, Darren P.
f599893a-36d7-46a9-9d03-64b1e7147ed4
Hubbard, Phil
6f0ff0e8-b62c-4e39-8e59-ee050e37d16e
Sage, Joanna
9b9f43a4-6269-4ea4-bd63-2ebfec6bd40a
Smith, Darren P.
f599893a-36d7-46a9-9d03-64b1e7147ed4
Hubbard, Phil
6f0ff0e8-b62c-4e39-8e59-ee050e37d16e

Sage, Joanna, Smith, Darren P. and Hubbard, Phil (2013) New-build studentification: a panacea for balanced communities? Urban Studies, online first. (doi:10.1177/0042098013477694). (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Rising concern about the negative impacts of students on “host communities” has triggered debates about the consequences of studentification in the UK. For some commentators, purpose-built student accommodation (PBSA) appears the panacea for studentification, as it offers the potential to reintroduce balance to studentified communities by redistributing student populations in regulated ways. This paper explores this contention, drawing upon focus groups and household surveys conducted in the vicinity of a PBSA development in Brighton (UK). The paper concludes that the location of this development in a densely populated neighbourhood has engendered adverse student / community relations, conflict, feelings of dispossession, and displacement of established local residents. It is asserted that future developments of PBSA should be mindful of these issues and their implications for questions of community cohesion, quality-of-life and belonging in established residential communities. These findings are discussed in relation to debates of age differentials, segregation, and new-build gentrification.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 2013
Organisations: Social Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 346640
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/346640
ISSN: 0042-0980
PURE UUID: 1c9304f4-027e-4fab-ae1d-b10c8c35a3ce

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Jan 2013 16:50
Last modified: 25 Nov 2021 21:56

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Joanna Sage
Author: Darren P. Smith
Author: Phil Hubbard

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×