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Housing ex-prisoners: the role of the third sector

Housing ex-prisoners: the role of the third sector
Housing ex-prisoners: the role of the third sector
Purpose – The aim of the paper is to examine the contribution made by housing-related third sector organisations (TSOs) in assisting ex-prisoners to find housing, and the barriers they face in doing so.

Design/methodology/approach – An offender survey was used to measure awareness of and engagement with TSOs in eight prisons, alongside qualitative interviews with prisoners, criminal justice staff and TSO representatives.

Findings – Despite the involvement of TSOs, securing accommodation for ex-prisoners remains complex and difficult, largely due to high service demand, housing shortages, budget cuts, and needs assessment and allocations systems which reduce the responsiveness of housing providers to the reducing re-offending agenda.

Research limitations/implications – The research benefited from a mixed-method approach which captured the perceptions of service users and professionals. The response rate for the offender survey was low (12 per cent), and the survey findings should be treated with caution.

Practical implications – Local authorities and other housing providers need to be more willing to accept ex-prisoners as potential service users, and better links need to be made between local homelessness strategies, choice based lettings systems and prisoner resettlement programmes. Providing support services to ex-offenders may encourage such acceptance and help to maintain the motivation to desist from crime.

Originality/value – Previous research has paid little specific attention to the role of TSOs in (ex)offender housing. This paper addresses this omission by drawing on original empirical research to examine the value of their work in securing accommodation for ex-prisoners and helping to reduce re-offending.
ex-offenders, ex-prisoners, homelessness, housing, re-offending, resettlement, social care problems, third sector organisations, united kingdom
1757-8043
38-49
Mills, Alice
16d8c043-116a-4e85-aaf5-e7f705428a77
Gojkovic, Dina
fcdfd55b-a2f9-4632-bd8a-847f98c49669
Meek, Rosie
018e0d68-7b66-483c-b769-1d4583cb4d85
Mullins, David
b25ca5ac-19f4-497c-b9f0-ff6c24604e36
Mills, Alice
16d8c043-116a-4e85-aaf5-e7f705428a77
Gojkovic, Dina
fcdfd55b-a2f9-4632-bd8a-847f98c49669
Meek, Rosie
018e0d68-7b66-483c-b769-1d4583cb4d85
Mullins, David
b25ca5ac-19f4-497c-b9f0-ff6c24604e36

Mills, Alice, Gojkovic, Dina, Meek, Rosie and Mullins, David (2013) Housing ex-prisoners: the role of the third sector. Safer Communities, 12 (1), 38-49. (doi:10.1108/17578041311293134).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose – The aim of the paper is to examine the contribution made by housing-related third sector organisations (TSOs) in assisting ex-prisoners to find housing, and the barriers they face in doing so.

Design/methodology/approach – An offender survey was used to measure awareness of and engagement with TSOs in eight prisons, alongside qualitative interviews with prisoners, criminal justice staff and TSO representatives.

Findings – Despite the involvement of TSOs, securing accommodation for ex-prisoners remains complex and difficult, largely due to high service demand, housing shortages, budget cuts, and needs assessment and allocations systems which reduce the responsiveness of housing providers to the reducing re-offending agenda.

Research limitations/implications – The research benefited from a mixed-method approach which captured the perceptions of service users and professionals. The response rate for the offender survey was low (12 per cent), and the survey findings should be treated with caution.

Practical implications – Local authorities and other housing providers need to be more willing to accept ex-prisoners as potential service users, and better links need to be made between local homelessness strategies, choice based lettings systems and prisoner resettlement programmes. Providing support services to ex-offenders may encourage such acceptance and help to maintain the motivation to desist from crime.

Originality/value – Previous research has paid little specific attention to the role of TSOs in (ex)offender housing. This paper addresses this omission by drawing on original empirical research to examine the value of their work in securing accommodation for ex-prisoners and helping to reduce re-offending.

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More information

Published date: 2013
Keywords: ex-offenders, ex-prisoners, homelessness, housing, re-offending, resettlement, social care problems, third sector organisations, united kingdom
Organisations: Social Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 346709
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/346709
ISSN: 1757-8043
PURE UUID: b05d1aa6-f18e-4c76-810e-ae620fae40e4

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Jan 2013 14:23
Last modified: 08 Nov 2021 23:27

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Contributors

Author: Alice Mills
Author: Dina Gojkovic
Author: Rosie Meek
Author: David Mullins

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