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Computer scientists meet professional issues: blended learning for a persistent challenge

Computer scientists meet professional issues: blended learning for a persistent challenge
Computer scientists meet professional issues: blended learning for a persistent challenge
Teaching professional issues to computer scientists presents academics with the two challenges. Firstly there is the issue of motivating students whose primary driver is their technical specialism. Secondly; how to persuade learners who may have chosen their field of studies with the explicit preference to avoid anything which is textual or discursive.

Biglan’s extensive study of disciplinary differences, work has been sustained and developed by a number of authors from a disciplinary and technology in learning perspective. He would have classified the approaches, content and epistemology of computer science as belonging predominantly to the ‘hard applied’ field of study, with a component of ‘hard pure’ which varies according to the particular specialism. By contrast, the curriculum of professional issues modules sit squarely in the ‘soft applied’ area. Understanding these differences, is, we believe, a powerful aid to integrating professional issues into the wider computing and technology curriculum. This challenge is not confined to computer science and is one which might find resonance with many involved in education in the STEM disciplines.

This oral presentation will recount experiences from the first iteration of a newly redesigned first year professional issues module which has been radically redesigned to incorporate a mixture of face to face and online educational activities. The design seeks to preserve the active participative student-centred nature of the existing module which it replaces, and at the same time provide a sustainable and compelling resource-set to which students will be able and willing to use throughout their degree studies.

The presentation will provide a detailed explanation of the rationale for these changes, alongside a discussion of the impact and implications of this type of change. It will also include analysis and interim evaluation of the impact and reception of the module by students.
STEM, Higher Education, Disciplinary Differences, Technology Enhanced Learning, Computer Science Education, Professional Issues, Blended Learning
White, Su
5f9a277b-df62-4079-ae97-b9c35264c146
Davis, Hugh C.
1608a3c8-0920-4a0c-82b3-ee29a52e7c1b
White, Su
5f9a277b-df62-4079-ae97-b9c35264c146
Davis, Hugh C.
1608a3c8-0920-4a0c-82b3-ee29a52e7c1b

White, Su and Davis, Hugh C. (2013) Computer scientists meet professional issues: blended learning for a persistent challenge. HEA-STEM: Annual Learning and Teaching Conference 2013, United Kingdom. 17 - 18 Apr 2013. (In Press)

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)

Abstract

Teaching professional issues to computer scientists presents academics with the two challenges. Firstly there is the issue of motivating students whose primary driver is their technical specialism. Secondly; how to persuade learners who may have chosen their field of studies with the explicit preference to avoid anything which is textual or discursive.

Biglan’s extensive study of disciplinary differences, work has been sustained and developed by a number of authors from a disciplinary and technology in learning perspective. He would have classified the approaches, content and epistemology of computer science as belonging predominantly to the ‘hard applied’ field of study, with a component of ‘hard pure’ which varies according to the particular specialism. By contrast, the curriculum of professional issues modules sit squarely in the ‘soft applied’ area. Understanding these differences, is, we believe, a powerful aid to integrating professional issues into the wider computing and technology curriculum. This challenge is not confined to computer science and is one which might find resonance with many involved in education in the STEM disciplines.

This oral presentation will recount experiences from the first iteration of a newly redesigned first year professional issues module which has been radically redesigned to incorporate a mixture of face to face and online educational activities. The design seeks to preserve the active participative student-centred nature of the existing module which it replaces, and at the same time provide a sustainable and compelling resource-set to which students will be able and willing to use throughout their degree studies.

The presentation will provide a detailed explanation of the rationale for these changes, alongside a discussion of the impact and implications of this type of change. It will also include analysis and interim evaluation of the impact and reception of the module by students.

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WhiteAndDavisHEA-STEM2013Blended.pdf - Other
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 17 April 2013
Venue - Dates: HEA-STEM: Annual Learning and Teaching Conference 2013, United Kingdom, 2013-04-17 - 2013-04-18
Keywords: STEM, Higher Education, Disciplinary Differences, Technology Enhanced Learning, Computer Science Education, Professional Issues, Blended Learning
Organisations: Web & Internet Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 346931
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/346931
PURE UUID: 0bada29d-3e48-4eda-8965-1459ebd8035b
ORCID for Su White: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9588-5275
ORCID for Hugh C. Davis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1182-1459

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Feb 2013 11:27
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:16

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