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The use of Raman microprobe spectroscopy in the analysis of electrically aged polymeric insulators

The use of Raman microprobe spectroscopy in the analysis of electrically aged polymeric insulators
The use of Raman microprobe spectroscopy in the analysis of electrically aged polymeric insulators
Due to its applications in high voltage insulation, a thorough understanding of the chemical reactions that occur during electrical ageing in polymers is needed. A confocal Raman microscope has a potential lateral resolution of ~1µm along both the lateral and optic axes and is able to characterise the localised chemical composition of a material; for this reason, it has been applied in the study of electrical ageing in solid dielectrics. Due to inaccurate assumptions about the optical processes involved in confocal Raman microprobe spectroscopy (CRMS), however, the exact characterisation of the processes and chemicals involved has previously proven to be difficult.

The objective of this study is to apply the technique of Raman microprobe spectroscopy in the analysis of the chemical structures of electrically aged polymers. It was found that, with the application of immersion oil and by using a refined version of a model of CRMS which is based on a photon scattering approach; CRMS is a valuable tool in the study of polymers. More accurate results can be obtained, however, by revealing the feature in question to the surface and applying non confocal Raman microprobe spectroscopy (RMS).

CRMS was applied to a variety of polymeric samples containing electrically aged voids and electrical trees. Results showed that within the electrically aged voids, chemical signatures similar to those previously found in electrical trees in PE can be found. Finally, a variety of polymeric insulators was subjected to spark ageing and corona discharge. The by-products of these ageing mechanisms were then characterized using RMS in an attempt to reproduce in bulk the chemical compounds formed in electrical treeing. The resulting Raman spectra indicated that the same by-products as those formed in voids and trees are indeed formed. Where possible all results were compared to comparative data obtained using Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and discussed in relation to previously published work.
Freebody, N.A.
72208702-6768-40e3-8380-1c24ac69393a
Freebody, N.A.
72208702-6768-40e3-8380-1c24ac69393a
Vaughan, Alun
6d813b66-17f9-4864-9763-25a6d659d8a3
Golosnoy, Igor
40603f91-7488-49ea-830f-24dd930573d1

(2012) The use of Raman microprobe spectroscopy in the analysis of electrically aged polymeric insulators. University of Southampton, Faculty of Physical & Applied Sciences, Doctoral Thesis, 208pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Due to its applications in high voltage insulation, a thorough understanding of the chemical reactions that occur during electrical ageing in polymers is needed. A confocal Raman microscope has a potential lateral resolution of ~1µm along both the lateral and optic axes and is able to characterise the localised chemical composition of a material; for this reason, it has been applied in the study of electrical ageing in solid dielectrics. Due to inaccurate assumptions about the optical processes involved in confocal Raman microprobe spectroscopy (CRMS), however, the exact characterisation of the processes and chemicals involved has previously proven to be difficult.

The objective of this study is to apply the technique of Raman microprobe spectroscopy in the analysis of the chemical structures of electrically aged polymers. It was found that, with the application of immersion oil and by using a refined version of a model of CRMS which is based on a photon scattering approach; CRMS is a valuable tool in the study of polymers. More accurate results can be obtained, however, by revealing the feature in question to the surface and applying non confocal Raman microprobe spectroscopy (RMS).

CRMS was applied to a variety of polymeric samples containing electrically aged voids and electrical trees. Results showed that within the electrically aged voids, chemical signatures similar to those previously found in electrical trees in PE can be found. Finally, a variety of polymeric insulators was subjected to spark ageing and corona discharge. The by-products of these ageing mechanisms were then characterized using RMS in an attempt to reproduce in bulk the chemical compounds formed in electrical treeing. The resulting Raman spectra indicated that the same by-products as those formed in voids and trees are indeed formed. Where possible all results were compared to comparative data obtained using Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and discussed in relation to previously published work.

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Published date: September 2012
Organisations: University of Southampton, Electronics & Computer Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 346963
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/346963
PURE UUID: 07d75e40-e4ce-486a-8f2e-9cb0e541dbfd
ORCID for Alun Vaughan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0535-513X

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Date deposited: 27 Feb 2013 12:13
Last modified: 09 May 2019 00:36

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