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Growth from birth to adulthood and peak bone mass and density data from the New Delhi Birth Cohort

Growth from birth to adulthood and peak bone mass and density data from the New Delhi Birth Cohort
Growth from birth to adulthood and peak bone mass and density data from the New Delhi Birth Cohort
Summary
Growth in early life may predict adult bone health. Our data showed that greater height and body mass index (BMI) gain in utero and infancy are associated with higher peak bone mass, and greater BMI gain in childhood/adolescence with higher peak bone density. These associations are mediated by attained adult height and BMI.

Introduction
To study the relationship of height and BMI during childhood with adult bone mineral content (BMC), areal density (aBMD) and apparent density (BMAD, estimated volumetric density).

Methods
Participants comprised 565 men and women aged 33–39 years from the New Delhi Birth Cohort, India, whose weight and height were recorded at birth and annually during infancy (0–2 years), childhood (2–11 years) and adolescence (11 years–adult). Lumbar spine, femoral neck and forearm BMC and aBMD were measured using dual X-ray absorptiometry; lumbar spine and femoral neck BMAD were calculated.

Results
Birth length, and height and height gain during infancy, childhood and adolescence were positively correlated with adult BMC (p?0.01 all sites except birth length with femoral neck). Correlations increased with height from birth to 6 years, then remained constant for later height measurements. There were no associations with BMAD. BMI at birth, and during childhood and adolescence was also positively correlated with BMC (p?<?0.01 all sites). BMI at 11 years, and BMI gain in childhood and adolescence, were correlated with aBMD and BMAD (p?<?0.001 for all); these correlations strengthened with increasing age of BMI measurement. The associations with height and BMI in early life became non-significant after adjustment for adult height and BMI.

Conclusions
Greater skeletal growth and BMI gain in utero and during infancy are associated with higher peak BMC, and greater BMI gain in childhood and adolescence is associated with higher peak aBMD and BMAD. These associations are mediated by the attainment of adult height and BMI, respectively.
0937-941X
2447-2459
Tandon, N.
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Fall, C.H.
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Osmond, C.
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Sachdev, H.P.S.
8667f0cc-a69a-4f5d-b140-14e06edd7894
Prabhakaran, D.
a272bffb-5ca4-4d20-af0e-e5de582889f9
Ramakrishnan, L.
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Dey Biswas, S.K.
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Ramji, S.
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Khalil, A.
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Gera, T.
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Reddy, K.S.
2204da4a-cddb-4d80-90ea-100cd306bd1f
Barker, D.J.
cabc3433-b628-43e5-9fd7-e6ff5769bf44
Cooper, C.
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Bhargava, S.K.
aaa4d65d-aa8b-463d-8dd2-51a9b8516f49
Tandon, N.
22a63117-5ee8-4c6b-9db6-0f696755d50f
Fall, C.H.
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18
Osmond, C.
2677bf85-494f-4a78-adf8-580e1b8acb81
Sachdev, H.P.S.
8667f0cc-a69a-4f5d-b140-14e06edd7894
Prabhakaran, D.
a272bffb-5ca4-4d20-af0e-e5de582889f9
Ramakrishnan, L.
1b32fc6e-9018-4833-8fb8-93a50ad43745
Dey Biswas, S.K.
ff0dccdd-9faa-439b-b038-ddd716573294
Ramji, S.
489d8056-df5e-42e1-b397-aab5ad5e748b
Khalil, A.
672213c3-6119-4791-8f0d-e90fcfa5d087
Gera, T.
993416ea-d906-4603-b913-5bda72e9c12c
Reddy, K.S.
2204da4a-cddb-4d80-90ea-100cd306bd1f
Barker, D.J.
cabc3433-b628-43e5-9fd7-e6ff5769bf44
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Bhargava, S.K.
aaa4d65d-aa8b-463d-8dd2-51a9b8516f49

Tandon, N., Fall, C.H., Osmond, C., Sachdev, H.P.S., Prabhakaran, D., Ramakrishnan, L., Dey Biswas, S.K., Ramji, S., Khalil, A., Gera, T., Reddy, K.S., Barker, D.J., Cooper, C. and Bhargava, S.K. (2012) Growth from birth to adulthood and peak bone mass and density data from the New Delhi Birth Cohort. Osteoporosis International, 23 (10), 2447-2459. (doi:10.1007/s00198-011-1857-x). (PMID:22237812)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Summary
Growth in early life may predict adult bone health. Our data showed that greater height and body mass index (BMI) gain in utero and infancy are associated with higher peak bone mass, and greater BMI gain in childhood/adolescence with higher peak bone density. These associations are mediated by attained adult height and BMI.

Introduction
To study the relationship of height and BMI during childhood with adult bone mineral content (BMC), areal density (aBMD) and apparent density (BMAD, estimated volumetric density).

Methods
Participants comprised 565 men and women aged 33–39 years from the New Delhi Birth Cohort, India, whose weight and height were recorded at birth and annually during infancy (0–2 years), childhood (2–11 years) and adolescence (11 years–adult). Lumbar spine, femoral neck and forearm BMC and aBMD were measured using dual X-ray absorptiometry; lumbar spine and femoral neck BMAD were calculated.

Results
Birth length, and height and height gain during infancy, childhood and adolescence were positively correlated with adult BMC (p?0.01 all sites except birth length with femoral neck). Correlations increased with height from birth to 6 years, then remained constant for later height measurements. There were no associations with BMAD. BMI at birth, and during childhood and adolescence was also positively correlated with BMC (p?<?0.01 all sites). BMI at 11 years, and BMI gain in childhood and adolescence, were correlated with aBMD and BMAD (p?<?0.001 for all); these correlations strengthened with increasing age of BMI measurement. The associations with height and BMI in early life became non-significant after adjustment for adult height and BMI.

Conclusions
Greater skeletal growth and BMI gain in utero and during infancy are associated with higher peak BMC, and greater BMI gain in childhood and adolescence is associated with higher peak aBMD and BMAD. These associations are mediated by the attainment of adult height and BMI, respectively.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: October 2012
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 347018
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/347018
ISSN: 0937-941X
PURE UUID: 90ded9fd-c9a4-4e0b-81f0-5cda6f719ab1
ORCID for C.H. Fall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4402-5552
ORCID for C. Osmond: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9054-4655
ORCID for C. Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Jan 2013 13:11
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:48

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Contributors

Author: N. Tandon
Author: C.H. Fall ORCID iD
Author: C. Osmond ORCID iD
Author: H.P.S. Sachdev
Author: D. Prabhakaran
Author: L. Ramakrishnan
Author: S.K. Dey Biswas
Author: S. Ramji
Author: A. Khalil
Author: T. Gera
Author: K.S. Reddy
Author: D.J. Barker
Author: C. Cooper ORCID iD
Author: S.K. Bhargava

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