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Creep mechanisms in an Mg–4Znalloy in the as-cast and aged conditions

Creep mechanisms in an Mg–4Znalloy in the as-cast and aged conditions
Creep mechanisms in an Mg–4Znalloy in the as-cast and aged conditions
The impression creep behavior of the as-cast and aged Mg–4 wt% Zn alloy was investigated in the temperature range of 423–523 K under constant punching stresses. The ageing treatment resulted in improved creep resistance of the alloy. The creep behavior of the material was divided into high- and low-stress regimes. The stress exponent values of both the as-cast and the aged conditions were close to each other at each temperature and were in the range of 4–6 and 8–10 in the low and high-stress regimes, respectively. The activation energy values of both regimes were stress dependent. The zero-stress activation energy values in the high- and low-stress regimes were close to the activation energy of lattice and pipe diffusion for both conditions, respectively. However, the activation energy decreased by increasing the applied stress. Stress assisted dislocation climb controlled by lattice and pipe diffusion were the dominant creep mechanisms in the alloy in the high- and low-stress regimes, respectively
0921-5093
423-430
Alizadeh, R.
8452d2d2-68c1-4a95-840f-8e19855799af
Mahmudi, R.
1e661235-7596-4004-9ace-4c81e6fe9b21
Langdon, T.G.
86e69b4f-e16d-4830-bf8a-5a9c11f0de86
Alizadeh, R.
8452d2d2-68c1-4a95-840f-8e19855799af
Mahmudi, R.
1e661235-7596-4004-9ace-4c81e6fe9b21
Langdon, T.G.
86e69b4f-e16d-4830-bf8a-5a9c11f0de86

Alizadeh, R., Mahmudi, R. and Langdon, T.G. (2013) Creep mechanisms in an Mg–4Znalloy in the as-cast and aged conditions. Materials Science and Engineering: A, 564, 423-430. (doi:10.1016/j.msea.2012.11.089).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The impression creep behavior of the as-cast and aged Mg–4 wt% Zn alloy was investigated in the temperature range of 423–523 K under constant punching stresses. The ageing treatment resulted in improved creep resistance of the alloy. The creep behavior of the material was divided into high- and low-stress regimes. The stress exponent values of both the as-cast and the aged conditions were close to each other at each temperature and were in the range of 4–6 and 8–10 in the low and high-stress regimes, respectively. The activation energy values of both regimes were stress dependent. The zero-stress activation energy values in the high- and low-stress regimes were close to the activation energy of lattice and pipe diffusion for both conditions, respectively. However, the activation energy decreased by increasing the applied stress. Stress assisted dislocation climb controlled by lattice and pipe diffusion were the dominant creep mechanisms in the alloy in the high- and low-stress regimes, respectively

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Published date: March 2013
Organisations: Engineering Mats & Surface Engineerg Gp

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 347090
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/347090
ISSN: 0921-5093
PURE UUID: 8b13378b-67f1-4293-8d88-5be0c2b536d9
ORCID for T.G. Langdon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3541-9250

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Date deposited: 17 Jan 2013 11:38
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:48

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Contributors

Author: R. Alizadeh
Author: R. Mahmudi
Author: T.G. Langdon ORCID iD

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