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Intelligence quotient in childhood and the risk of illegal drug us in middle-age

Intelligence quotient in childhood and the risk of illegal drug us in middle-age
Intelligence quotient in childhood and the risk of illegal drug us in middle-age
Purpose: high childhood IQ test scores have been associated with increased alcohol dependency and use in adult life, but the relationship between childhood IQ and illegal drug use in later life is unclear.

Methods: participants were 6713 members of the 1958 National Child Development Survey whose IQ was assessed at 11 years and had their lifetime illegal drug use measured at 42 years of age.

Results: in analyses adjusted for a range of covariates, a 1 SD (15-point) increase in IQ scores was associated with an increased risk of illegal drug use in women: ever using cannabis (odds ratio [OR], 1.30; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.16–1.45), cocaine (OR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.21–2.27), amphetamines (OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.22–1.83), amyl nitrate (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.30–2.46) and “magic mushrooms” (OR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.18–1.98). Associations were of lower magnitude in men.

Conclusions: in this cohort, high childhood IQ was related to illegal drug use in adulthood
intelligence, street drugs, social class
1047-2797
654-657
White, James W.
0e04aaa3-7bb0-4169-b128-9070b19ed334
Gale, Catherine R.
5bb2abb3-7b53-42d6-8aa7-817e193140c8
Batty, G. David
605ce199-493d-4238-b9c8-a2c076672e83
White, James W.
0e04aaa3-7bb0-4169-b128-9070b19ed334
Gale, Catherine R.
5bb2abb3-7b53-42d6-8aa7-817e193140c8
Batty, G. David
605ce199-493d-4238-b9c8-a2c076672e83

White, James W., Gale, Catherine R. and Batty, G. David (2012) Intelligence quotient in childhood and the risk of illegal drug us in middle-age. Annals of Epidemiology, 22 (9), 654-657. (doi:10.1016/j.annepidem.2012.06.001). (PMID:22776465)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose: high childhood IQ test scores have been associated with increased alcohol dependency and use in adult life, but the relationship between childhood IQ and illegal drug use in later life is unclear.

Methods: participants were 6713 members of the 1958 National Child Development Survey whose IQ was assessed at 11 years and had their lifetime illegal drug use measured at 42 years of age.

Results: in analyses adjusted for a range of covariates, a 1 SD (15-point) increase in IQ scores was associated with an increased risk of illegal drug use in women: ever using cannabis (odds ratio [OR], 1.30; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.16–1.45), cocaine (OR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.21–2.27), amphetamines (OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.22–1.83), amyl nitrate (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.30–2.46) and “magic mushrooms” (OR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.18–1.98). Associations were of lower magnitude in men.

Conclusions: in this cohort, high childhood IQ was related to illegal drug use in adulthood

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More information

Published date: September 2012
Keywords: intelligence, street drugs, social class
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 347103
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/347103
ISSN: 1047-2797
PURE UUID: 62727027-9435-415e-9c70-4147fb1f312d
ORCID for Catherine R. Gale: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3361-8638

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Jan 2013 09:56
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:44

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Contributors

Author: James W. White
Author: G. David Batty

University divisions

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