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Tissue engineering strategies in spinal arthrodesis: the clinical imperative and challenges to clinical translation

Tissue engineering strategies in spinal arthrodesis: the clinical imperative and challenges to clinical translation
Tissue engineering strategies in spinal arthrodesis: the clinical imperative and challenges to clinical translation
Skeletal disorders requiring the regeneration or de novo production of bone present considerable reconstructive challenges and are one of the main driving forces for the development of skeletal tissue engineering strategies. The skeletal or mesenchymal stem cell is a fundamental requirement for osteogenesis and plays a pivotal role in the design and application of these strategies. Research activity has focused on incorporating the biological role of the mesenchymal stem cell with the developing fields of material science and gene therapy in order to create a construct that is not only capable of inducing host osteoblasts to produce bone, but is also osteogenic in its own right. This review explores the clinical need for reparative approaches in spinal arthrodesis, identifying recent tissue engineering strategies employed to promote spinal fusion, and considers the ongoing challenges to successful clinical translation.
1746-0751
49-64
Evans, Nick R.
4ec42031-c347-472b-92cc-c02416d0f72d
Davies, Evan M.
1d356564-889a-4681-ad66-e32a301207d9
Dare, Chris J.
5a79bdbe-315f-424a-995c-3f29c89af7b0
Oreffo, Richard O.C.
ff9fff72-6855-4d0f-bfb2-311d0e8f3778
Evans, Nick R.
4ec42031-c347-472b-92cc-c02416d0f72d
Davies, Evan M.
1d356564-889a-4681-ad66-e32a301207d9
Dare, Chris J.
5a79bdbe-315f-424a-995c-3f29c89af7b0
Oreffo, Richard O.C.
ff9fff72-6855-4d0f-bfb2-311d0e8f3778

Evans, Nick R., Davies, Evan M., Dare, Chris J. and Oreffo, Richard O.C. (2013) Tissue engineering strategies in spinal arthrodesis: the clinical imperative and challenges to clinical translation. Regenerative Medicine, 8 (1), 49-64. (doi:10.2217/rme.12.106). (PMID:23259805)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Skeletal disorders requiring the regeneration or de novo production of bone present considerable reconstructive challenges and are one of the main driving forces for the development of skeletal tissue engineering strategies. The skeletal or mesenchymal stem cell is a fundamental requirement for osteogenesis and plays a pivotal role in the design and application of these strategies. Research activity has focused on incorporating the biological role of the mesenchymal stem cell with the developing fields of material science and gene therapy in order to create a construct that is not only capable of inducing host osteoblasts to produce bone, but is also osteogenic in its own right. This review explores the clinical need for reparative approaches in spinal arthrodesis, identifying recent tissue engineering strategies employed to promote spinal fusion, and considers the ongoing challenges to successful clinical translation.

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Published date: January 2013
Organisations: Human Development & Health

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Local EPrints ID: 347329
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/347329
ISSN: 1746-0751
PURE UUID: b484c36a-dc61-4601-b487-13cf19c6e939
ORCID for Richard O.C. Oreffo: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5995-6726

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Jan 2013 13:29
Last modified: 02 Aug 2023 01:41

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Contributors

Author: Nick R. Evans
Author: Evan M. Davies
Author: Chris J. Dare

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