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TMS Summer School, Oxford UK

TMS Summer School, Oxford UK
TMS Summer School, Oxford UK
Introduction: About 65 percent of stroke survivors cannot involve their affected upper limb (UL) into their activities of daily living (Bruce & Dobkin 2005). Robot Therapy (RT) is one technique that can increase the intensity of rehabilitation and evidence shows that robot-assisted arm training results in reduction of UL motor impairments (Lo et al. 2010). Recently, RT has also been combined with a non-invasive method of brain stimulation, transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) (Hesse et al. 2011). When comparing real to sham tDCS in addition with RT, non- significant differences in UL motor recovery of people with sub-acute stroke were demonstrated. A possible reason for this was that the robot used in the study was a one-dimensional wrist robot which did not allow the impaired UL to move in different dimensions. Thus, the main objective of this research is to explore whether combining tDCS with unilateral three-dimensional robot therapy for people with stroke leads to better outcomes in impairment, function and corticospinal neurophysiology measures than robot therapy alone.

Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted to investigate different methodologies used for applying tDCS and RT. The evidence was synthesized to generate the final protocol.

Results: A pilot, double-blinded randomised controlled trial is underway using a three-dimensional Armeo® robot with tDCS. The trial involves two groups of participants with sub-acute stroke: 1) Armeo RT and real tDCS, and 2) Armeo RT and sham tDCS. Each participant will receive an intervention programme involving 18 sessions over 8 weeks. Each session will consist of twenty minutes of real or sham tDCS during 1 hour of RT. Clinical and neurophysiological measures using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation will be utilised pre- and post- intervention and at the 3 month follow-up.

Conclusions: Research into non-invasive brain stimulation and RT seems promising but to translate research findings into clinical stroke practice, further research is needed. This study will add to the body of knowledge of neurorehabilitation research.
Tedesco Triccas, Lisa
3025a000-1602-4a7e-81fc-ad5fd7af17bd
Burridge, Jane
0110e9ea-0884-4982-a003-cb6307f38f64
Hughes, Ann-Marie
11239f51-de47-4445-9a0d-5b82ddc11dea
Verheyden, Geert
78296cc2-60c7-41d7-a215-9d04cdf8ed01
Desikan, Malekshmi
667a1cae-389d-4db3-bde7-370f09935167
Rothwell, John
39a8ec47-603a-49d6-a534-272212d7a44e
Tedesco Triccas, Lisa
3025a000-1602-4a7e-81fc-ad5fd7af17bd
Burridge, Jane
0110e9ea-0884-4982-a003-cb6307f38f64
Hughes, Ann-Marie
11239f51-de47-4445-9a0d-5b82ddc11dea
Verheyden, Geert
78296cc2-60c7-41d7-a215-9d04cdf8ed01
Desikan, Malekshmi
667a1cae-389d-4db3-bde7-370f09935167
Rothwell, John
39a8ec47-603a-49d6-a534-272212d7a44e

Tedesco Triccas, Lisa, Burridge, Jane, Hughes, Ann-Marie, Verheyden, Geert, Desikan, Malekshmi and Rothwell, John (2012) TMS Summer School, Oxford UK. Magstim Neuroscience Conference and Workshop 2012, United Kingdom. 12 - 13 May 2012.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

Introduction: About 65 percent of stroke survivors cannot involve their affected upper limb (UL) into their activities of daily living (Bruce & Dobkin 2005). Robot Therapy (RT) is one technique that can increase the intensity of rehabilitation and evidence shows that robot-assisted arm training results in reduction of UL motor impairments (Lo et al. 2010). Recently, RT has also been combined with a non-invasive method of brain stimulation, transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) (Hesse et al. 2011). When comparing real to sham tDCS in addition with RT, non- significant differences in UL motor recovery of people with sub-acute stroke were demonstrated. A possible reason for this was that the robot used in the study was a one-dimensional wrist robot which did not allow the impaired UL to move in different dimensions. Thus, the main objective of this research is to explore whether combining tDCS with unilateral three-dimensional robot therapy for people with stroke leads to better outcomes in impairment, function and corticospinal neurophysiology measures than robot therapy alone.

Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted to investigate different methodologies used for applying tDCS and RT. The evidence was synthesized to generate the final protocol.

Results: A pilot, double-blinded randomised controlled trial is underway using a three-dimensional Armeo® robot with tDCS. The trial involves two groups of participants with sub-acute stroke: 1) Armeo RT and real tDCS, and 2) Armeo RT and sham tDCS. Each participant will receive an intervention programme involving 18 sessions over 8 weeks. Each session will consist of twenty minutes of real or sham tDCS during 1 hour of RT. Clinical and neurophysiological measures using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation will be utilised pre- and post- intervention and at the 3 month follow-up.

Conclusions: Research into non-invasive brain stimulation and RT seems promising but to translate research findings into clinical stroke practice, further research is needed. This study will add to the body of knowledge of neurorehabilitation research.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 12 May 2012
Venue - Dates: Magstim Neuroscience Conference and Workshop 2012, United Kingdom, 2012-05-12 - 2012-05-13
Organisations: Physical & Rehabilitation Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 347358
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/347358
PURE UUID: 8f7223d6-5cf5-494c-83dd-6ecb31e329c0
ORCID for Jane Burridge: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3497-6725
ORCID for Ann-Marie Hughes: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3958-8206

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Feb 2013 12:21
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:59

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