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The mechanics of flexor tendon adhesions

The mechanics of flexor tendon adhesions
The mechanics of flexor tendon adhesions
The mechanics of adhesions at a local tissue level have not been extensively studied. This study compared microstrains and macrostrains in adhesions of immobilized and mobilized partially lacerated flexor digitorum profundus tendons in a New Zealand White rabbit model. At 2 weeks, 50 digits were randomized to either gross tensile testing or micromechanical assessment, in which the movement of fluorescently labelled cell nuclei, acting as dynamic markers, was visualized using real-time confocal microscopy. The structural stiffness and load at failure of immobilized adhesions were 140% and 160% of that of mobilized adhesions, respectively, and both differences were statistically significant. Micromechanically, different patterns of loading and failure were observed. Mobilized adhesions exhibited over a three-fold higher local strain, which was less uniformly distributed. Confocal microscopy provided an accurate measure of local strain. For the first time, it has been possible to visualize, define, and quantify local adhesion tissue mechanics. Mobilization appears to favour the formation of sites expressing increased local strain responses or those predisposed to heterogeneity and localized failure
adhesion, confocal, flexor mechanics, mobilization, tendon
555-563
Branford, O.A.
4ecc7401-367d-4660-8d69-4958ea523946
Lee, D.A.
fbbf7169-d08b-4deb-ae87-a2cbd97c58e7
Bader, Dan L.
9884d4f6-2607-4d48-bf0c-62bdcc0d1dbf
Grobbelaar, A.O.
34d9dd2c-fc4d-4bf9-b329-76022e3b37af
Branford, O.A.
4ecc7401-367d-4660-8d69-4958ea523946
Lee, D.A.
fbbf7169-d08b-4deb-ae87-a2cbd97c58e7
Bader, Dan L.
9884d4f6-2607-4d48-bf0c-62bdcc0d1dbf
Grobbelaar, A.O.
34d9dd2c-fc4d-4bf9-b329-76022e3b37af

Branford, O.A., Lee, D.A., Bader, Dan L. and Grobbelaar, A.O. (2012) The mechanics of flexor tendon adhesions. Journal of Hand Surgery (European Volume), 37 (6), 555-563. (doi:10.1177/1753193411432675). (PMID:22170243)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The mechanics of adhesions at a local tissue level have not been extensively studied. This study compared microstrains and macrostrains in adhesions of immobilized and mobilized partially lacerated flexor digitorum profundus tendons in a New Zealand White rabbit model. At 2 weeks, 50 digits were randomized to either gross tensile testing or micromechanical assessment, in which the movement of fluorescently labelled cell nuclei, acting as dynamic markers, was visualized using real-time confocal microscopy. The structural stiffness and load at failure of immobilized adhesions were 140% and 160% of that of mobilized adhesions, respectively, and both differences were statistically significant. Micromechanically, different patterns of loading and failure were observed. Mobilized adhesions exhibited over a three-fold higher local strain, which was less uniformly distributed. Confocal microscopy provided an accurate measure of local strain. For the first time, it has been possible to visualize, define, and quantify local adhesion tissue mechanics. Mobilization appears to favour the formation of sites expressing increased local strain responses or those predisposed to heterogeneity and localized failure

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More information

Published date: July 2012
Keywords: adhesion, confocal, flexor mechanics, mobilization, tendon
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 347515
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/347515
PURE UUID: f2363598-4336-4318-a1e8-531bdea81d4a
ORCID for Dan L. Bader: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1208-3507

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Jan 2013 09:39
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:32

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