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Pattern of birth in early-onset anorexia nervosa: an equatorial study

Pattern of birth in early-onset anorexia nervosa: an equatorial study
Pattern of birth in early-onset anorexia nervosa: an equatorial study
Objective: Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) born in the northern and southern hemispheres are more likely to be born during spring months than at any other time of the year. It has been hypothesized that environmental temperature at the time of conception may have a significant role in this pattern of findings. The current study aims to investigate the pattern of birth of early-onset AN patients in an equatorial region (Singapore), where there is little difference in environmental temperature throughout the year.

Method: Dates of birth were collected for 102 patients who were born in Singapore and diagnosed with early-onset AN. The patterns of birth were analyzed using chi-square analysis.

Results: There was no difference across the year in the birth patterns of patients with early-onset AN in Singapore, nor were there any differences between patients with restrictive and binge/purge AN.

Discussion: This lack of seasonal variation in the equator adds support to the "temperature at conception" hypothesis.
pattern of birth, singapore, equator, anorexia nervosa, early onset
0276-3478
61-64
Willoughby, Kate
f920c076-e8de-4104-8617-00b28011aa72
Bowen, Rebecca
8cc062bd-ac21-44ee-bbdf-1f74ba1ea793
Lee, Ee-Lian
c3e38a4e-96e4-4747-a3f6-ac8314f7d631
Pathy, Parvathy
ee018aaf-3c04-4e88-9c6c-ef8d7a38e007
Lask, Bryan
cd217286-5307-48f9-ac7d-a41de3317b94
Willoughby, Kate
f920c076-e8de-4104-8617-00b28011aa72
Bowen, Rebecca
8cc062bd-ac21-44ee-bbdf-1f74ba1ea793
Lee, Ee-Lian
c3e38a4e-96e4-4747-a3f6-ac8314f7d631
Pathy, Parvathy
ee018aaf-3c04-4e88-9c6c-ef8d7a38e007
Lask, Bryan
cd217286-5307-48f9-ac7d-a41de3317b94

Willoughby, Kate, Bowen, Rebecca, Lee, Ee-Lian, Pathy, Parvathy and Lask, Bryan (2005) Pattern of birth in early-onset anorexia nervosa: an equatorial study. The International Journal of Eating Disorders, 37 (1), 61-64. (doi:10.1002/eat.20069). (PMID:15690468)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) born in the northern and southern hemispheres are more likely to be born during spring months than at any other time of the year. It has been hypothesized that environmental temperature at the time of conception may have a significant role in this pattern of findings. The current study aims to investigate the pattern of birth of early-onset AN patients in an equatorial region (Singapore), where there is little difference in environmental temperature throughout the year.

Method: Dates of birth were collected for 102 patients who were born in Singapore and diagnosed with early-onset AN. The patterns of birth were analyzed using chi-square analysis.

Results: There was no difference across the year in the birth patterns of patients with early-onset AN in Singapore, nor were there any differences between patients with restrictive and binge/purge AN.

Discussion: This lack of seasonal variation in the equator adds support to the "temperature at conception" hypothesis.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 22 December 2004
Published date: January 2005
Keywords: pattern of birth, singapore, equator, anorexia nervosa, early onset
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 347529
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/347529
ISSN: 0276-3478
PURE UUID: 1b4f8dfa-b388-4ffe-bb30-cd3100ccb689

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Jan 2013 11:31
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:45

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