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Developmental exposure to bisphenol A leads to cardiometabolic dysfunction in adult mouse offspring

Developmental exposure to bisphenol A leads to cardiometabolic dysfunction in adult mouse offspring
Developmental exposure to bisphenol A leads to cardiometabolic dysfunction in adult mouse offspring
Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical compound that has adverse health outcomes in adults when exposed during the perinatal period. However, its effect on cardiovascular function remains to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the effects of daily administration of BPA to pregnant mice from gestational days 11 to 19 on cardiometabolic outcomes in the adult offspring. Prenatal BPA exposure resulted in altered growth trajectory and organ size, increase adiposity and impaired glucose homeostasis in male and female offspring. In addition, these BPA offspring exhibited raised systolic blood pressure, and in the males this was accompanied by impaired vascular tone. The aortas in females, but not in males, from the BPA group also showed reduced estrogen receptor gene expression. These results indicate that prenatal exposure to BPA increased susceptibility of the offspring to developing cardiovascular and metabolic dysfunction later in life
287-292
Cagampang, F.R.
7cf57d52-4a65-4554-8306-ed65226bc50e
Torrens, Christopher
15a35713-0651-4249-8227-5901e2cfcd22
Anthony, F.W.
398b8bed-237e-4fad-a77d-89266fb00bc0
Hanson, Mark A.
1952fad1-abc7-4284-a0bc-a7eb31f70a3f
Cagampang, F.R.
7cf57d52-4a65-4554-8306-ed65226bc50e
Torrens, Christopher
15a35713-0651-4249-8227-5901e2cfcd22
Anthony, F.W.
398b8bed-237e-4fad-a77d-89266fb00bc0
Hanson, Mark A.
1952fad1-abc7-4284-a0bc-a7eb31f70a3f

Cagampang, F.R., Torrens, Christopher, Anthony, F.W. and Hanson, Mark A. (2012) Developmental exposure to bisphenol A leads to cardiometabolic dysfunction in adult mouse offspring. Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, 3 (4), 287-292.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical compound that has adverse health outcomes in adults when exposed during the perinatal period. However, its effect on cardiovascular function remains to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the effects of daily administration of BPA to pregnant mice from gestational days 11 to 19 on cardiometabolic outcomes in the adult offspring. Prenatal BPA exposure resulted in altered growth trajectory and organ size, increase adiposity and impaired glucose homeostasis in male and female offspring. In addition, these BPA offspring exhibited raised systolic blood pressure, and in the males this was accompanied by impaired vascular tone. The aortas in females, but not in males, from the BPA group also showed reduced estrogen receptor gene expression. These results indicate that prenatal exposure to BPA increased susceptibility of the offspring to developing cardiovascular and metabolic dysfunction later in life

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More information

Published date: August 2012
Organisations: Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 347567
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/347567
PURE UUID: 1e15c5a3-96cb-4949-8c7f-264254691e53
ORCID for F.R. Cagampang: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4404-9853
ORCID for Mark A. Hanson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6907-613X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Jan 2013 15:23
Last modified: 29 Oct 2019 01:56

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