The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Review. Activation patterns of microglia and their identification in the human brain

Review. Activation patterns of microglia and their identification in the human brain
Review. Activation patterns of microglia and their identification in the human brain
Microglia in the central nervous system are usually maintained in a quiescent state. When activated, they can perform many diverse functions which may be either beneficial or harmful depending on the situation. Although microglial activation may be accompanied by changes in morphology, morphological changes cannot accurately predict the function being undertaken by a microglial cell. Studies of peripheral macrophages and in vitro and animal studies of microglia have resulted in the definition of specific activation states: M1 (classical activation) and M2 (sometimes subdivided into alternative activation and acquired deactivation). Some authors have suggested that these might be an overlapping continuum of functions rather than discrete categories. In this review, we consider translational aspects of our knowledge of microglia: specifically, we discuss the question as to what extent different activation states of microglia exist in the human central nervous system, which tools can be used to identify them and emerging evidence for such changes in ageing and in Alzheimer's disease.
0305-1846
3-18
Boche, D.
bdcca10e-6302-4dd0-919f-67218f7e0d61
Perry, V.H.
8f29d36a-8e1f-4082-8700-09483bbaeae4
Nicoll, J.A.R.
88c0685f-000e-4eb7-8f72-f36b4985e8ed
Boche, D.
bdcca10e-6302-4dd0-919f-67218f7e0d61
Perry, V.H.
8f29d36a-8e1f-4082-8700-09483bbaeae4
Nicoll, J.A.R.
88c0685f-000e-4eb7-8f72-f36b4985e8ed

Boche, D., Perry, V.H. and Nicoll, J.A.R. (2013) Review. Activation patterns of microglia and their identification in the human brain. Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology, 39 (1), 3-18. (doi:10.1111/nan.12011). (PMID:23252647)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Microglia in the central nervous system are usually maintained in a quiescent state. When activated, they can perform many diverse functions which may be either beneficial or harmful depending on the situation. Although microglial activation may be accompanied by changes in morphology, morphological changes cannot accurately predict the function being undertaken by a microglial cell. Studies of peripheral macrophages and in vitro and animal studies of microglia have resulted in the definition of specific activation states: M1 (classical activation) and M2 (sometimes subdivided into alternative activation and acquired deactivation). Some authors have suggested that these might be an overlapping continuum of functions rather than discrete categories. In this review, we consider translational aspects of our knowledge of microglia: specifically, we discuss the question as to what extent different activation states of microglia exist in the human central nervous system, which tools can be used to identify them and emerging evidence for such changes in ageing and in Alzheimer's disease.

Text
2013 NAN review.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

Published date: February 2013
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 347615
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/347615
ISSN: 0305-1846
PURE UUID: 866de746-af3f-4362-b000-74b490e1b81e
ORCID for D. Boche: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5884-130X
ORCID for J.A.R. Nicoll: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9444-7246

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Jan 2013 10:53
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 00:49

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×