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Patterns of neural connectivity during an attention bias task moderate associations between early childhood temperament and internalizing symptoms in young adulthood

Patterns of neural connectivity during an attention bias task moderate associations between early childhood temperament and internalizing symptoms in young adulthood
Patterns of neural connectivity during an attention bias task moderate associations between early childhood temperament and internalizing symptoms in young adulthood
Background
Biased attention to threat is found in both individuals with anxiety symptoms and children with the childhood temperament of behavioral inhibition (BI). Although perturbed fronto-amygdala function is implicated in biased attention among anxious individuals, no work has examined the neural correlates of attention biases in BI. Work in this area might clarify underlying mechanisms for anxiety in a sample at risk for internalizing disorders. We examined the relations among early childhood BI, fronto-amygdala connectivity during an attention bias task in young adulthood, and internalizing symptoms, assessed in young adulthood.

Methods
Children were assessed for BI at multiple age points from infancy through age seven. On the basis of a composite of observational and maternal report data, we selected 21 young adults classified as having a history of BI and 23 classified as non-BI for this study (n = 44). Participants completed an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging attention-bias task involving threat (angry faces) and neutral trials. Internalizing symptoms were assessed by self-report and diagnostic interviews.

Results
The young adults characterized in childhood with BI exhibited greater strength in threat-related connectivity than non-behaviorally inhibited young adults. Between-group differences manifested in connections between the amygdala and two frontal regions: dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior insula. Amygdala-insula connectivity also interacted with childhood BI to predict young adult internalizing symptoms.

Conclusions
Behavioral inhibition during early childhood predicts differences as young adults in threat and attention-related fronto-amygdala connectivity. Connectivity strength, in turn, moderated the relations between early BI and later psychopathology.
attention bias, functional connectivity, granger causality, imaging, internalizing problems, temperament
0006-3223
273-279
Hardee, Jillian E.
4ee806db-c36d-4ec1-bdc6-f6204c7c203e
Benson, Brenda E.
363d4a98-083c-4717-86f7-6d3c0b306caf
Bar-Haim, Yair
338e47cf-30fd-41d6-a9cc-2f5c85fe5eee
Mogg, Karin
5f1474af-85f5-4fd3-8eb6-0371be848e30
Bradley, Brendan P.
bdacaa6c-528b-4086-9448-27ebfe463514
Chen, Gang
83a5c46f-13cc-4be3-ad5b-698a69e82b8e
Britton, Jennifer C.
85e7aebc-e0ee-4d8e-bbcc-b75121bf6c92
Ernst, Monique
3906e5f6-2105-48af-9b78-a00482acac1c
Fox, Nathan A.
b325ebd0-b31b-4d2c-ae71-7a734a518e4f
Pine, Daniel S.
debffc1c-1efc-4bcf-81b3-87aadee1047d
Perez-Edgar, Koraly
deac26f5-58df-4ff9-b726-d7eda79b7547
Hardee, Jillian E.
4ee806db-c36d-4ec1-bdc6-f6204c7c203e
Benson, Brenda E.
363d4a98-083c-4717-86f7-6d3c0b306caf
Bar-Haim, Yair
338e47cf-30fd-41d6-a9cc-2f5c85fe5eee
Mogg, Karin
5f1474af-85f5-4fd3-8eb6-0371be848e30
Bradley, Brendan P.
bdacaa6c-528b-4086-9448-27ebfe463514
Chen, Gang
83a5c46f-13cc-4be3-ad5b-698a69e82b8e
Britton, Jennifer C.
85e7aebc-e0ee-4d8e-bbcc-b75121bf6c92
Ernst, Monique
3906e5f6-2105-48af-9b78-a00482acac1c
Fox, Nathan A.
b325ebd0-b31b-4d2c-ae71-7a734a518e4f
Pine, Daniel S.
debffc1c-1efc-4bcf-81b3-87aadee1047d
Perez-Edgar, Koraly
deac26f5-58df-4ff9-b726-d7eda79b7547

Hardee, Jillian E., Benson, Brenda E., Bar-Haim, Yair, Mogg, Karin, Bradley, Brendan P., Chen, Gang, Britton, Jennifer C., Ernst, Monique, Fox, Nathan A., Pine, Daniel S. and Perez-Edgar, Koraly (2013) Patterns of neural connectivity during an attention bias task moderate associations between early childhood temperament and internalizing symptoms in young adulthood. [in special issue: Depression: Risk, Rhythms, and Response] Biological Psychiatry, 74 (4), 273-279. (doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2013.01.036). (PMID:23489415)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background
Biased attention to threat is found in both individuals with anxiety symptoms and children with the childhood temperament of behavioral inhibition (BI). Although perturbed fronto-amygdala function is implicated in biased attention among anxious individuals, no work has examined the neural correlates of attention biases in BI. Work in this area might clarify underlying mechanisms for anxiety in a sample at risk for internalizing disorders. We examined the relations among early childhood BI, fronto-amygdala connectivity during an attention bias task in young adulthood, and internalizing symptoms, assessed in young adulthood.

Methods
Children were assessed for BI at multiple age points from infancy through age seven. On the basis of a composite of observational and maternal report data, we selected 21 young adults classified as having a history of BI and 23 classified as non-BI for this study (n = 44). Participants completed an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging attention-bias task involving threat (angry faces) and neutral trials. Internalizing symptoms were assessed by self-report and diagnostic interviews.

Results
The young adults characterized in childhood with BI exhibited greater strength in threat-related connectivity than non-behaviorally inhibited young adults. Between-group differences manifested in connections between the amygdala and two frontal regions: dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior insula. Amygdala-insula connectivity also interacted with childhood BI to predict young adult internalizing symptoms.

Conclusions
Behavioral inhibition during early childhood predicts differences as young adults in threat and attention-related fronto-amygdala connectivity. Connectivity strength, in turn, moderated the relations between early BI and later psychopathology.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 25 January 2013
Published date: 15 August 2013
Keywords: attention bias, functional connectivity, granger causality, imaging, internalizing problems, temperament
Organisations: Clinical Neuroscience

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 348089
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/348089
ISSN: 0006-3223
PURE UUID: 657ff7b0-d3c0-43fc-a93b-25ea67b046b1
ORCID for Brendan P. Bradley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2801-4271

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Date deposited: 06 Feb 2013 12:25
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:06

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Contributors

Author: Jillian E. Hardee
Author: Brenda E. Benson
Author: Yair Bar-Haim
Author: Karin Mogg
Author: Gang Chen
Author: Jennifer C. Britton
Author: Monique Ernst
Author: Nathan A. Fox
Author: Daniel S. Pine
Author: Koraly Perez-Edgar

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