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Data visualization in archaeology

Data visualization in archaeology
Data visualization in archaeology
Archaeological field work produces vast amounts of three-dimensionally recorded data which can only be analysed using computers. Developments in data-visualization techniques are continually increasing the volume and complexity of data that can be studied meaningfully. In particular, three systems developed at the IBM United Kingdom Scientific Centre have been applied in a wide variety of archaeological situations: a graphics-database system called the Winchester Graphics System (WGS), IBMs IAX (Image Applications eXecutive) image processing system, and the WINchester SOlid Modelling system called WINSOM. It has been shown that these systems not only permit well-known problems to be answered in new and interesting ways but have freed archaeologists to explore previously undiscovered avenues of research. The techniques developed using these systems also have major implications for education and training.
569-579
Reilly, Paul
b0803f86-2c58-411b-91c4-7c25415e2a67
Reilly, Paul
b0803f86-2c58-411b-91c4-7c25415e2a67

(1989) Data visualization in archaeology. IBM Systems Journal, 28 (4), 569-579.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Archaeological field work produces vast amounts of three-dimensionally recorded data which can only be analysed using computers. Developments in data-visualization techniques are continually increasing the volume and complexity of data that can be studied meaningfully. In particular, three systems developed at the IBM United Kingdom Scientific Centre have been applied in a wide variety of archaeological situations: a graphics-database system called the Winchester Graphics System (WGS), IBMs IAX (Image Applications eXecutive) image processing system, and the WINchester SOlid Modelling system called WINSOM. It has been shown that these systems not only permit well-known problems to be answered in new and interesting ways but have freed archaeologists to explore previously undiscovered avenues of research. The techniques developed using these systems also have major implications for education and training.

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Published date: 1989
Organisations: Modern Languages

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 348179
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/348179
PURE UUID: 232b10ac-8ba7-474e-96b1-90321ad4e728

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Date deposited: 22 Apr 2013 09:17
Last modified: 11 Nov 2017 22:35

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