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Grip strength in a cohort of older medical inpatients in Malaysia: a pilot study to describe the range, determinants and association with length of hospital stay

Grip strength in a cohort of older medical inpatients in Malaysia: a pilot study to describe the range, determinants and association with length of hospital stay
Grip strength in a cohort of older medical inpatients in Malaysia: a pilot study to describe the range, determinants and association with length of hospital stay
Grip strength is a marker of sarcopenia, the age-related decline in muscle mass and function, and has been little researched in Asian populations. We aimed to describe the feasibility and acceptability of measuring grip strength in hospitalized, older people in Malaysia and to explore its range, determinants and association with length of stay. Patients admitted acutely to the geriatrics ward of a teaching hospital were consecutively recruited. Inability to consent or use the dynamometer led to exclusion. Maximum grip strength, anthropometric data, length of hospital stay, discharge destination, 3-point Barthel score, mini-mental state examination, falls history and number of co-morbidities and medications on admission were recorded. 80/153 (52%) eligible patients were recruited (52 women; age range 64–100 years). 9/153 (6%) refused to participate and 64/153 (42%) were excluded (34 too unwell, 24 unable to consent, 4 unable to use the dynamometer, 2 other reasons). 76/80 patients (95%) reported that they would undergo grip strength measurement again. Determinants were similar to those of Caucasian populations but grip strength values were lower. After adjustment for sex, age and height, stronger grip strength was associated with shorter length of stay [hazard ratio 1.05 (95% CI 1.00, 1.09; P = 0.03)]. This is the first report of grip strength measurement in hospitalized older people in Malaysia. It was feasible, acceptable to participants and associated with length of stay. Further research is warranted to elucidate the normative range in different ethnic groups and explore its potential use in clinical practice in Malaysia
0167-4943
155-159
Keevil, Victoria
3d1e60f7-4734-4dea-ba8a-aef2581d4dfe
Razali, Rizah Mazzuin
87b18e7c-fa8f-4833-b517-d3f79bff091e
Chin, Ai-Vyrn
0b178d95-2521-4233-b43d-ec1219bd225a
Jameson, Karen
d5fb142d-06af-456e-9016-17497f94e9f2
Aihie-Sayer, Avan Aihie
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb
Roberts, Helen
5ea688b1-ef7a-4173-9da0-26290e18f253
Keevil, Victoria
3d1e60f7-4734-4dea-ba8a-aef2581d4dfe
Razali, Rizah Mazzuin
87b18e7c-fa8f-4833-b517-d3f79bff091e
Chin, Ai-Vyrn
0b178d95-2521-4233-b43d-ec1219bd225a
Jameson, Karen
d5fb142d-06af-456e-9016-17497f94e9f2
Aihie-Sayer, Avan Aihie
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb
Roberts, Helen
5ea688b1-ef7a-4173-9da0-26290e18f253

Keevil, Victoria, Razali, Rizah Mazzuin, Chin, Ai-Vyrn, Jameson, Karen, Aihie-Sayer, Avan Aihie and Roberts, Helen (2013) Grip strength in a cohort of older medical inpatients in Malaysia: a pilot study to describe the range, determinants and association with length of hospital stay. Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 56 (1), 155-159. (doi:10.1016/j.archger.2012.10.005). (PMID:23116975)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Grip strength is a marker of sarcopenia, the age-related decline in muscle mass and function, and has been little researched in Asian populations. We aimed to describe the feasibility and acceptability of measuring grip strength in hospitalized, older people in Malaysia and to explore its range, determinants and association with length of stay. Patients admitted acutely to the geriatrics ward of a teaching hospital were consecutively recruited. Inability to consent or use the dynamometer led to exclusion. Maximum grip strength, anthropometric data, length of hospital stay, discharge destination, 3-point Barthel score, mini-mental state examination, falls history and number of co-morbidities and medications on admission were recorded. 80/153 (52%) eligible patients were recruited (52 women; age range 64–100 years). 9/153 (6%) refused to participate and 64/153 (42%) were excluded (34 too unwell, 24 unable to consent, 4 unable to use the dynamometer, 2 other reasons). 76/80 patients (95%) reported that they would undergo grip strength measurement again. Determinants were similar to those of Caucasian populations but grip strength values were lower. After adjustment for sex, age and height, stronger grip strength was associated with shorter length of stay [hazard ratio 1.05 (95% CI 1.00, 1.09; P = 0.03)]. This is the first report of grip strength measurement in hospitalized older people in Malaysia. It was feasible, acceptable to participants and associated with length of stay. Further research is warranted to elucidate the normative range in different ethnic groups and explore its potential use in clinical practice in Malaysia

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Published date: January 2013
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 348212
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/348212
ISSN: 0167-4943
PURE UUID: 5d99481f-269e-4604-ab62-54be05109307
ORCID for Helen Roberts: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5291-1880

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Date deposited: 08 Feb 2013 15:15
Last modified: 29 Oct 2019 01:53

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Contributors

Author: Victoria Keevil
Author: Rizah Mazzuin Razali
Author: Ai-Vyrn Chin
Author: Karen Jameson
Author: Avan Aihie Aihie-Sayer
Author: Helen Roberts ORCID iD

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