The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Effect of Vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy on offspring bone structure, composition and quality in later life

Effect of Vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy on offspring bone structure, composition and quality in later life
Effect of Vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy on offspring bone structure, composition and quality in later life
During foetal development, calcium requirements are met as a consequence of maternal adaptations independent of vitamin D status. In contrast, after birth, dependency on vitamin D appears necessary for calcium metabolism and skeletal health. We used a rodent model (Sprague-Dawley rats), to determine if maternal vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy had a deleterious effect on bone structure at birth. Vitamin D deplete females were maintained under deplete conditions until birth of the pups, whereupon all dams were fed a vitamin D replete diet. Offspring were harvested at birth, and 140 days of age. Bones were analyzed using micro-computed tomography and strength tested to study differences in bone structure, density and strength and subjected to elemental analysis using plasma mass spectrometry to determine strontium, barium and calcium contents. Offspring from deplete mothers displayed altered trabecular parameters in the femur at birth and 140 days of age. In addition, at 140 days of age there was evidence of premature mineralization of the secondary ossification centre of the femoral head. Elemental analysis showed increased strontium uptake in the femur of the developmentally vitamin D-deficient offspring. Vitamin D depletion during development in the offspring may have a long-lasting effect, despite repletion of vitamin D from birth. This may have consequences for human health given the low vitamin D levels seen during pregnancy and current lifestyle of sun avoidance due to the risk of skin cancer.
49-55
Lanham, S.A.
28fdbbef-e3b6-4fdf-bd0f-4968eeb614d6
Roberts, C.
b1dc377a-04e8-4757-9e1c-faaf8361ed7a
Habgood, A.K.
3f05d063-3799-4c00-a080-96f1190fe3e8
Alexander, S
d86bb179-6fe7-414d-90b9-592f89287929
Burne, T.H.J.
8c2697b1-02a4-4711-a214-706c5a78cba1
Eyles, D.W.
a2c0fe08-3e39-4f0d-ae81-7e6ad04dd2ab
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
McGrath, J.J.
b1e7f190-8d7d-4ef2-b145-f43f4050f9ff
Oreffo, Richard O.C.
ff9fff72-6855-4d0f-bfb2-311d0e8f3778
Lanham, S.A.
28fdbbef-e3b6-4fdf-bd0f-4968eeb614d6
Roberts, C.
b1dc377a-04e8-4757-9e1c-faaf8361ed7a
Habgood, A.K.
3f05d063-3799-4c00-a080-96f1190fe3e8
Alexander, S
d86bb179-6fe7-414d-90b9-592f89287929
Burne, T.H.J.
8c2697b1-02a4-4711-a214-706c5a78cba1
Eyles, D.W.
a2c0fe08-3e39-4f0d-ae81-7e6ad04dd2ab
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
McGrath, J.J.
b1e7f190-8d7d-4ef2-b145-f43f4050f9ff
Oreffo, Richard O.C.
ff9fff72-6855-4d0f-bfb2-311d0e8f3778

Lanham, S.A., Roberts, C., Habgood, A.K., Alexander, S, Burne, T.H.J., Eyles, D.W., Cooper, Cyrus, McGrath, J.J. and Oreffo, Richard O.C. (2013) Effect of Vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy on offspring bone structure, composition and quality in later life. Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, 4 (1), 49-55. (doi:10.1017/S2040174412000542).

Record type: Article

Abstract

During foetal development, calcium requirements are met as a consequence of maternal adaptations independent of vitamin D status. In contrast, after birth, dependency on vitamin D appears necessary for calcium metabolism and skeletal health. We used a rodent model (Sprague-Dawley rats), to determine if maternal vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy had a deleterious effect on bone structure at birth. Vitamin D deplete females were maintained under deplete conditions until birth of the pups, whereupon all dams were fed a vitamin D replete diet. Offspring were harvested at birth, and 140 days of age. Bones were analyzed using micro-computed tomography and strength tested to study differences in bone structure, density and strength and subjected to elemental analysis using plasma mass spectrometry to determine strontium, barium and calcium contents. Offspring from deplete mothers displayed altered trabecular parameters in the femur at birth and 140 days of age. In addition, at 140 days of age there was evidence of premature mineralization of the secondary ossification centre of the femoral head. Elemental analysis showed increased strontium uptake in the femur of the developmentally vitamin D-deficient offspring. Vitamin D depletion during development in the offspring may have a long-lasting effect, despite repletion of vitamin D from birth. This may have consequences for human health given the low vitamin D levels seen during pregnancy and current lifestyle of sun avoidance due to the risk of skin cancer.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 26 July 2012
Published date: February 2013
Organisations: Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 348216
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/348216
PURE UUID: 99602d26-d4ee-4282-b252-1eaf1a3c100a
ORCID for S.A. Lanham: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4516-264X
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for Richard O.C. Oreffo: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5995-6726

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Feb 2013 15:07
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 01:46

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: S.A. Lanham ORCID iD
Author: C. Roberts
Author: A.K. Habgood
Author: S Alexander
Author: T.H.J. Burne
Author: D.W. Eyles
Author: Cyrus Cooper ORCID iD
Author: J.J. McGrath

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×