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A consideration of biomarkers to be used for evaluation of inflammation in human nutritional studies

A consideration of biomarkers to be used for evaluation of inflammation in human nutritional studies
A consideration of biomarkers to be used for evaluation of inflammation in human nutritional studies
To monitor inflammation in a meaningful way, the markers used must be valid: they must reflect the inflammatory process under study and they must be predictive of future health status. In 2009, the Nutrition and Immunity Task Force of the International Life Sciences Institute, European Branch, organized an expert group to attempt to identify robust and predictive markers, or patterns or clusters of markers, which can be used to assess inflammation in human nutrition studies in the general population. Inflammation is a normal process and there are a number of cells and mediators involved. These markers are involved in, or are produced as a result of, the inflammatory process irrespective of its trigger and its location and are common to all inflammatory situations. Currently, there is no consensus as to which markers of inflammation best represent low-grade inflammation or differentiate between acute and chronic inflammation or between the various phases of inflammatory responses. There are a number of modifying factors that affect the concentration of an inflammatory marker at a given time, including age, diet and body fatness, among others. Measuring the concentration of inflammatory markers in the bloodstream under basal conditions is probably less informative compared with data related to the concentration change in response to a challenge. A number of inflammatory challenges have been described. However, many of these challenges are poorly standardised. Patterns and clusters may be important as robust biomarkers of inflammation. Therefore, it is likely that a combination of multiple inflammatory markers and integrated readouts based upon kinetic analysis following defined challenges will be the most informative biomarker of inflammation.
0007-1145
S1-S34
Calder, Philip C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Ahluwalia, N.
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Albers, R.
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Bosco, N.
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Bourdet-Sicard, R.
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Haller, D.
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Holgate, S.
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Jonsson, L.
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Latulippe, M.
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Marcos, A.
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Moreines, J.
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M’Rini, C.
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Muller, M.
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Pawelec, G.
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van Neerven, R.
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Watzl, B.
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Zhao, J.
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Calder, Philip C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Ahluwalia, N.
85c716e5-eb2d-43e2-957f-2a80bde977e6
Albers, R.
63eb3d3b-2052-4ad1-a7aa-888a6781c5e0
Bosco, N.
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Bourdet-Sicard, R.
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Haller, D.
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Holgate, S.
27bad16f-3563-447a-9d15-21587c71391e
Jonsson, L.
c1e79c46-5825-4d8c-82e6-b1e00b609c82
Latulippe, M.
081a0316-cf4d-430a-beb5-9d65f4f6d481
Marcos, A.
ad293bdf-4d7a-434e-bb93-a8c371be981d
Moreines, J.
8ba23116-773f-4f2a-b64e-0387b2c33302
M’Rini, C.
eaa84c8a-1b7b-416e-8173-99c5de95a53c
Muller, M.
359678c4-5d02-4ef8-b381-f31238f339d1
Pawelec, G.
0119050f-c819-417e-838f-65439424a708
van Neerven, R.
b3561e41-1cc5-42ce-94be-4062a5df8b14
Watzl, B.
e3909f88-5054-421d-b1b4-9586f2ec60fc
Zhao, J.
5807b9d4-d0e4-4992-a69b-c276636c1691

Calder, Philip C., Ahluwalia, N., Albers, R., Bosco, N., Bourdet-Sicard, R., Haller, D., Holgate, S., Jonsson, L., Latulippe, M., Marcos, A., Moreines, J., M’Rini, C., Muller, M., Pawelec, G., van Neerven, R., Watzl, B. and Zhao, J. (2013) A consideration of biomarkers to be used for evaluation of inflammation in human nutritional studies. British Journal of Nutrition, 109, supplement 1, S1-S34. (doi:10.1017/S0007114512005119). (PMID:23343744)

Record type: Article

Abstract

To monitor inflammation in a meaningful way, the markers used must be valid: they must reflect the inflammatory process under study and they must be predictive of future health status. In 2009, the Nutrition and Immunity Task Force of the International Life Sciences Institute, European Branch, organized an expert group to attempt to identify robust and predictive markers, or patterns or clusters of markers, which can be used to assess inflammation in human nutrition studies in the general population. Inflammation is a normal process and there are a number of cells and mediators involved. These markers are involved in, or are produced as a result of, the inflammatory process irrespective of its trigger and its location and are common to all inflammatory situations. Currently, there is no consensus as to which markers of inflammation best represent low-grade inflammation or differentiate between acute and chronic inflammation or between the various phases of inflammatory responses. There are a number of modifying factors that affect the concentration of an inflammatory marker at a given time, including age, diet and body fatness, among others. Measuring the concentration of inflammatory markers in the bloodstream under basal conditions is probably less informative compared with data related to the concentration change in response to a challenge. A number of inflammatory challenges have been described. However, many of these challenges are poorly standardised. Patterns and clusters may be important as robust biomarkers of inflammation. Therefore, it is likely that a combination of multiple inflammatory markers and integrated readouts based upon kinetic analysis following defined challenges will be the most informative biomarker of inflammation.

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Published date: January 2013
Organisations: Human Development & Health

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Local EPrints ID: 348458
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/348458
ISSN: 0007-1145
PURE UUID: 495eb11b-a4ae-491d-a10c-62dd8b4bc33a

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Date deposited: 13 Feb 2013 16:46
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 04:50

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Contributors

Author: N. Ahluwalia
Author: R. Albers
Author: N. Bosco
Author: R. Bourdet-Sicard
Author: D. Haller
Author: S. Holgate
Author: L. Jonsson
Author: M. Latulippe
Author: A. Marcos
Author: J. Moreines
Author: C. M’Rini
Author: M. Muller
Author: G. Pawelec
Author: R. van Neerven
Author: B. Watzl
Author: J. Zhao

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