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Early nutrition programming of long-term health

Early nutrition programming of long-term health
Early nutrition programming of long-term health
Increasing evidence from the EU Project EARNEST and many other investigators demonstrates that early nutrition and lifestyle have long-term effects on later health and the risk of common non-communicable diseases (known as 'developmental programming'). Because of the increasing public health importance and the transgenerational nature of the problem, obesity and associated disorders are the focus of the new EU funded project 'EarlyNutrition'. Currently, three key hypotheses have been defined: the fuel mediated 'in utero' hypothesis suggests that intrauterine exposure to an excess of fuels, most notably glucose, causes permanent changes of the fetus that lead to obesity in postnatal life; the accelerated postnatal weight gain hypothesis proposes an association between rapid weight gain in infancy and an increased risk of later obesity and adverse outcomes; and the mismatch hypothesis suggests that experiencing a developmental 'mismatch' between a sub-optimal perinatal and an obesogenic childhood environment is related to a particular predisposition to obesity and corresponding co-morbidities. Using existing cohort studies, ongoing and novel intervention studies and a basic science programme to investigate those key hypotheses, project EarlyNutrition will provide the scientific foundations for evidence-based recommendations for optimal nutrition considering long-term health outcomes, with a focus on obesity and related disorders. Scientific and technical expertise in placental biology, epigenetics and metabolomics will provide understanding at the cellular and molecular level of the relationships between early life nutritional status and the risk of later adiposity. This will help refine strategies for intervention in early life to prevent obesity.
early nutrition, developmental programming, obesity and related disorders, key hypothesis
0029-6651
371-378
Koletzko, B.
1d600e42-8989-4634-848b-203029211ffc
Brands, B.
2ed5a497-5471-4bba-be8b-1f64f1acf557
Poston, L.
7503d11e-bc6a-4925-b622-bf2937ab1722
Demmelmair, H.
5f090572-168a-4f1b-9b28-9262093668b9
Koletzko, B.
1d600e42-8989-4634-848b-203029211ffc
Brands, B.
2ed5a497-5471-4bba-be8b-1f64f1acf557
Poston, L.
7503d11e-bc6a-4925-b622-bf2937ab1722
Demmelmair, H.
5f090572-168a-4f1b-9b28-9262093668b9

Koletzko, B., Brands, B., Poston, L. and Demmelmair, H. (2012) Early nutrition programming of long-term health. [in special issue: Symposium on ‘Metabolic Flexibility in Animal and Human Nutrition’] Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, 71 (3), 371-378. (doi:10.1017/S0029665112000596.). (PMID:22703585)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Increasing evidence from the EU Project EARNEST and many other investigators demonstrates that early nutrition and lifestyle have long-term effects on later health and the risk of common non-communicable diseases (known as 'developmental programming'). Because of the increasing public health importance and the transgenerational nature of the problem, obesity and associated disorders are the focus of the new EU funded project 'EarlyNutrition'. Currently, three key hypotheses have been defined: the fuel mediated 'in utero' hypothesis suggests that intrauterine exposure to an excess of fuels, most notably glucose, causes permanent changes of the fetus that lead to obesity in postnatal life; the accelerated postnatal weight gain hypothesis proposes an association between rapid weight gain in infancy and an increased risk of later obesity and adverse outcomes; and the mismatch hypothesis suggests that experiencing a developmental 'mismatch' between a sub-optimal perinatal and an obesogenic childhood environment is related to a particular predisposition to obesity and corresponding co-morbidities. Using existing cohort studies, ongoing and novel intervention studies and a basic science programme to investigate those key hypotheses, project EarlyNutrition will provide the scientific foundations for evidence-based recommendations for optimal nutrition considering long-term health outcomes, with a focus on obesity and related disorders. Scientific and technical expertise in placental biology, epigenetics and metabolomics will provide understanding at the cellular and molecular level of the relationships between early life nutritional status and the risk of later adiposity. This will help refine strategies for intervention in early life to prevent obesity.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 18 June 2012
Published date: August 2012
Additional Information: Session I: Early nutrition programming, life performance and cognitive function
Keywords: early nutrition, developmental programming, obesity and related disorders, key hypothesis
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 348461
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/348461
ISSN: 0029-6651
PURE UUID: e2971727-7dfe-4991-b0a7-743671e474de

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Date deposited: 13 Feb 2013 16:50
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:43

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Contributors

Author: B. Koletzko
Author: B. Brands
Author: L. Poston
Author: H. Demmelmair

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