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Reverse shoulder arthroplasty leads to significant biomechanical changes in the remaining rotator cuff

Reverse shoulder arthroplasty leads to significant biomechanical changes in the remaining rotator cuff
Reverse shoulder arthroplasty leads to significant biomechanical changes in the remaining rotator cuff
Objective: after reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) external and internal rotation will often remain restricted. A postoperative alteration of the biomechanics in the remaining cuff is discussed as a contributing factor to these functional deficits.

Methods: in this study, muscle moment arms as well as origin-to-insertion distance (OID) were calculated using three-dimensional models of the shoulder derived from CT scans of seven cadaveric specimens.

Results: moment arms for humeral rotation are significantly smaller for the cranial segments of SSC and all segments of TMIN in abduction angles of 30 degrees and above (p ≤ 0.05). Abduction moment arms were significantly decreased for all segments (p ≤ 0.002). OID was significantly smaller for all muscles at the 15 degree position (p ≤ 0.005), apart from the cranial SSC segment.

Conclusions: reduced rotational moment arms in conjunction with the decrease of OID may be a possible explanation for the clinically observed impaired external and internal rotation.
1749-799X
42-[7pp]
Herrmann, Sebastian
7349c5cc-93d8-4a0f-8294-bb8437834264
Konig, Christian
46643532-9317-4118-9b46-db9323308ca8
Heller, Markus
3da19d2a-f34d-4ff1-8a34-9b5a7e695829
Perka, Carsten
50eac0cf-e710-45df-a04b-b8af775eace1
Greiner, Stefan
611330d2-4918-47c9-82b0-521986b09c82
Herrmann, Sebastian
7349c5cc-93d8-4a0f-8294-bb8437834264
Konig, Christian
46643532-9317-4118-9b46-db9323308ca8
Heller, Markus
3da19d2a-f34d-4ff1-8a34-9b5a7e695829
Perka, Carsten
50eac0cf-e710-45df-a04b-b8af775eace1
Greiner, Stefan
611330d2-4918-47c9-82b0-521986b09c82

Herrmann, Sebastian, Konig, Christian, Heller, Markus, Perka, Carsten and Greiner, Stefan (2011) Reverse shoulder arthroplasty leads to significant biomechanical changes in the remaining rotator cuff. Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, 6 (1), 42-[7pp]. (doi:10.1186/1749-799X-6-42). (PMID:21846390)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: after reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) external and internal rotation will often remain restricted. A postoperative alteration of the biomechanics in the remaining cuff is discussed as a contributing factor to these functional deficits.

Methods: in this study, muscle moment arms as well as origin-to-insertion distance (OID) were calculated using three-dimensional models of the shoulder derived from CT scans of seven cadaveric specimens.

Results: moment arms for humeral rotation are significantly smaller for the cranial segments of SSC and all segments of TMIN in abduction angles of 30 degrees and above (p ≤ 0.05). Abduction moment arms were significantly decreased for all segments (p ≤ 0.002). OID was significantly smaller for all muscles at the 15 degree position (p ≤ 0.005), apart from the cranial SSC segment.

Conclusions: reduced rotational moment arms in conjunction with the decrease of OID may be a possible explanation for the clinically observed impaired external and internal rotation.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: August 2011
Organisations: Bioengineering Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 348531
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/348531
ISSN: 1749-799X
PURE UUID: 583923fe-1ca5-4c30-9a67-06a359535426
ORCID for Markus Heller: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7879-1135

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Feb 2013 08:50
Last modified: 21 Nov 2019 01:32

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