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Extreme levels of noise constitute a key neuromuscular deficit in the elderly

Extreme levels of noise constitute a key neuromuscular deficit in the elderly
Extreme levels of noise constitute a key neuromuscular deficit in the elderly
Fluctuations during isometric force production tasks occur due to the inability of musculature to generate purely constant submaximal forces and are considered to be an estimation of neuromuscular noise. The human sensori-motor system regulates complex interactions between multiple afferent and efferent systems, which results in variability during functional task performance. Since muscles are the only active component of the motor system, it therefore seems reasonable that neuromuscular noise plays a key role in governing variability during both standing and walking. Seventy elderly women (including 34 fallers) performed multiple repetitions of isometric force production, quiet standing and walking tasks. No relationship between neuromuscular noise and functional task performance was observed in either the faller or the non-faller cohorts. When classified into groups with either nominal (group NOM, 25th –75th percentile) or extreme (either too high or too low, group EXT) levels of neuromuscular noise, group NOM demonstrated a clear association (r2>0.23, p<0.05) between neuromuscular noise and variability during task performance. On the other hand, group EXT demonstrated no such relationship, but also tended to walk slower, and had lower stride lengths, as well as lower isometric strength. These results suggest that neuromuscular noise is related to the quality of both static and dynamic functional task performance, but also that extreme levels of neuromuscular noise constitute a key neuromuscular deficit in the elderly
1932-6203
e48449
Singh, Navrag B.
5d72e10d-6656-497c-8972-7545b039286a
König, Niklas
cf553979-f9c5-4309-ac13-fd0f2eadd22c
Arampatzis, Adamantios
61089ec5-a329-4672-80e7-879bbb30dbac
Heller, Markus O.
3da19d2a-f34d-4ff1-8a34-9b5a7e695829
Taylor, William R.
1ed48ef6-e396-40f5-8434-6c0628c9d3ca
Singh, Navrag B.
5d72e10d-6656-497c-8972-7545b039286a
König, Niklas
cf553979-f9c5-4309-ac13-fd0f2eadd22c
Arampatzis, Adamantios
61089ec5-a329-4672-80e7-879bbb30dbac
Heller, Markus O.
3da19d2a-f34d-4ff1-8a34-9b5a7e695829
Taylor, William R.
1ed48ef6-e396-40f5-8434-6c0628c9d3ca

Singh, Navrag B., König, Niklas, Arampatzis, Adamantios, Heller, Markus O. and Taylor, William R. (2012) Extreme levels of noise constitute a key neuromuscular deficit in the elderly. PLoS ONE, 7 (11), e48449. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0048449).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Fluctuations during isometric force production tasks occur due to the inability of musculature to generate purely constant submaximal forces and are considered to be an estimation of neuromuscular noise. The human sensori-motor system regulates complex interactions between multiple afferent and efferent systems, which results in variability during functional task performance. Since muscles are the only active component of the motor system, it therefore seems reasonable that neuromuscular noise plays a key role in governing variability during both standing and walking. Seventy elderly women (including 34 fallers) performed multiple repetitions of isometric force production, quiet standing and walking tasks. No relationship between neuromuscular noise and functional task performance was observed in either the faller or the non-faller cohorts. When classified into groups with either nominal (group NOM, 25th –75th percentile) or extreme (either too high or too low, group EXT) levels of neuromuscular noise, group NOM demonstrated a clear association (r2>0.23, p<0.05) between neuromuscular noise and variability during task performance. On the other hand, group EXT demonstrated no such relationship, but also tended to walk slower, and had lower stride lengths, as well as lower isometric strength. These results suggest that neuromuscular noise is related to the quality of both static and dynamic functional task performance, but also that extreme levels of neuromuscular noise constitute a key neuromuscular deficit in the elderly

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Published date: 6 November 2012
Organisations: Bioengineering Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 348539
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/348539
ISSN: 1932-6203
PURE UUID: 364be5af-ac88-49a7-857e-8f0884a95e1b
ORCID for Markus O. Heller: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7879-1135

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Date deposited: 15 Feb 2013 14:12
Last modified: 18 Jul 2019 00:40

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