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Reverse logistics for the management of waste

Reverse logistics for the management of waste
Reverse logistics for the management of waste
Research into sustainable distribution has largely focussed on improving the delivery of products through the supply chain from manufacturer to end customer by developing fundamental understanding of the various supply chain operations at work in urban centres. The logistics activities associated with the return of damaged, unsold or returned consumer products back up the supply chain, and the consolidation, handling and disposal of waste products that may result, is becoming of increasing interest in the drive to reduce costs and maximise efficiency within the distribution sector.

With the introduction of the EC Directives on Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) (2002/96/EC), the Restriction of the Use of Certain Hazardous Substances (RoHS) in Electrical and Electronic Equipment (2002/95/EC), and Packaging and Packaging Waste (94/62/EC), the onus is on retailers and manufacturers to reduce their waste output and better manage their respective logistics operations in this area by participating in specific waste take-back schemes.

The need to effectively manage product returns as part of the supply chain process has become more pronounced since the introduction of the Directive on Distance Contract (97/7/EC), which stipulates that anyone who makes a purchase via the Internet, telephone, fax or mail order is able to change their mind during a ‘cooling-off’ period of seven working days after the goods have been received with no explanation for their return being required.

Under this backdrop of increasingly liberal returns policies coupled with a ‘throw away’ consumer culture, the extent to which product returns contribute to increasing waste and recyclate generation needs to be explored. With a variety of centralised and decentralised supply chain mechanisms being employed to service retailers, there is potential scope for co-ordinating reverse processes to both reduce collective transport impacts and maximise re-use value from the recyclate generated.
9780749466251
242-262
Kogan Page
Cherrett, T.J.
e5929951-e97c-4720-96a8-3e586f2d5f95
Maynard, S.
a6cb202f-0090-4095-9c62-a5abe1469c26
McLeod, F.N.
93da13ec-7f81-470f-8a01-9339e80abe98
Hickford, A.J.
55d34672-b7bb-47d4-97a6-095304c429de
Cherrett, T.J.
e5929951-e97c-4720-96a8-3e586f2d5f95
Maynard, S.
a6cb202f-0090-4095-9c62-a5abe1469c26
McLeod, F.N.
93da13ec-7f81-470f-8a01-9339e80abe98
Hickford, A.J.
55d34672-b7bb-47d4-97a6-095304c429de

Cherrett, T.J., Maynard, S., McLeod, F.N. and Hickford, A.J. (2012) Reverse logistics for the management of waste. In, Green Logistics: Improving the environmental sustainability of logistics. London, GB. Kogan Page, pp. 242-262.

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Research into sustainable distribution has largely focussed on improving the delivery of products through the supply chain from manufacturer to end customer by developing fundamental understanding of the various supply chain operations at work in urban centres. The logistics activities associated with the return of damaged, unsold or returned consumer products back up the supply chain, and the consolidation, handling and disposal of waste products that may result, is becoming of increasing interest in the drive to reduce costs and maximise efficiency within the distribution sector.

With the introduction of the EC Directives on Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) (2002/96/EC), the Restriction of the Use of Certain Hazardous Substances (RoHS) in Electrical and Electronic Equipment (2002/95/EC), and Packaging and Packaging Waste (94/62/EC), the onus is on retailers and manufacturers to reduce their waste output and better manage their respective logistics operations in this area by participating in specific waste take-back schemes.

The need to effectively manage product returns as part of the supply chain process has become more pronounced since the introduction of the Directive on Distance Contract (97/7/EC), which stipulates that anyone who makes a purchase via the Internet, telephone, fax or mail order is able to change their mind during a ‘cooling-off’ period of seven working days after the goods have been received with no explanation for their return being required.

Under this backdrop of increasingly liberal returns policies coupled with a ‘throw away’ consumer culture, the extent to which product returns contribute to increasing waste and recyclate generation needs to be explored. With a variety of centralised and decentralised supply chain mechanisms being employed to service retailers, there is potential scope for co-ordinating reverse processes to both reduce collective transport impacts and maximise re-use value from the recyclate generated.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 3 December 2012
Organisations: Transportation Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 348547
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/348547
ISBN: 9780749466251
PURE UUID: bf1333ce-c1f2-4454-bc1c-ac1e2c70d4fd
ORCID for F.N. McLeod: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5784-9342
ORCID for A.J. Hickford: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6414-9064

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Feb 2013 12:30
Last modified: 13 Jun 2019 00:39

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