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Can locker box logistics enable more human-centric medical supply chains?

Can locker box logistics enable more human-centric medical supply chains?
Can locker box logistics enable more human-centric medical supply chains?
There are a range of non-clinical support services within hospitals, such as catering, linen / laundry and supply logistics, which are widely considered to have a significant effect on the delivery and quality of patient care. Supply chain activities are regarded as one of the most important owing to the potentially fatal consequences of ‘stock-outs’ (Özkil et al. 2009; Costantino et al. 2010) where key inventory becomes temporarily unavailable. As a result, hospitals typically employ inventory buffers but in spite of such practices, stock-outs still occur due to disparities in inventory requirements between the hospital and suppliers; the presence of unusual demand for specific items (Jarret 2006); and, receipt of goods which are faulty, contaminated or otherwise unfit for purpose. In such events, the supply chain needs to be agile, responding quickly in order to cater for demand. However, due to the structure of the healthcare supply chain which consists of an external chain (delivering goods to the hospital) and internal hospital chain (distributing delivered goods to end users throughout the hospital), the fast flow of goods is often stalled by the interface between the two (Aronsson et al. 2011).

This paper critically assesses the current supply chain practices implemented at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) NHS Trust in London in relation to those that could be utilised, whilst presenting a new concept of supply for key lines and items to the trust using unattended electronic locker boxes to create a more individualistic human-centric service for users, with the overall aim of improving the speed of the distribution of goods both internally (between players once inventory has arrived at the hospital) and externally (for inventory being delivered into the hospital from outside).
Bailey, Gavin
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Cherrett, T.J.
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Waterson, Ben
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Bailey, Gavin
b5be6ab7-45fa-4176-a9ea-84bef64ab631
Cherrett, T.J.
e5929951-e97c-4720-96a8-3e586f2d5f95
Waterson, Ben
60a59616-54f7-4c31-920d-975583953286

Bailey, Gavin, Cherrett, T.J. and Waterson, Ben (2012) Can locker box logistics enable more human-centric medical supply chains? 17th Logistics Research Network Conference 2012, Cranfield, United Kingdom. 05 - 07 Sep 2012. 8 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

There are a range of non-clinical support services within hospitals, such as catering, linen / laundry and supply logistics, which are widely considered to have a significant effect on the delivery and quality of patient care. Supply chain activities are regarded as one of the most important owing to the potentially fatal consequences of ‘stock-outs’ (Özkil et al. 2009; Costantino et al. 2010) where key inventory becomes temporarily unavailable. As a result, hospitals typically employ inventory buffers but in spite of such practices, stock-outs still occur due to disparities in inventory requirements between the hospital and suppliers; the presence of unusual demand for specific items (Jarret 2006); and, receipt of goods which are faulty, contaminated or otherwise unfit for purpose. In such events, the supply chain needs to be agile, responding quickly in order to cater for demand. However, due to the structure of the healthcare supply chain which consists of an external chain (delivering goods to the hospital) and internal hospital chain (distributing delivered goods to end users throughout the hospital), the fast flow of goods is often stalled by the interface between the two (Aronsson et al. 2011).

This paper critically assesses the current supply chain practices implemented at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) NHS Trust in London in relation to those that could be utilised, whilst presenting a new concept of supply for key lines and items to the trust using unattended electronic locker boxes to create a more individualistic human-centric service for users, with the overall aim of improving the speed of the distribution of goods both internally (between players once inventory has arrived at the hospital) and externally (for inventory being delivered into the hospital from outside).

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More information

Published date: September 2012
Venue - Dates: 17th Logistics Research Network Conference 2012, Cranfield, United Kingdom, 2012-09-05 - 2012-09-07
Organisations: Transportation Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 348584
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/348584
PURE UUID: e374fb6f-f8e4-4861-9c25-b7078bf45df0
ORCID for Ben Waterson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9817-7119

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Feb 2013 12:44
Last modified: 14 Dec 2018 01:36

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