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Developmental origins of non-communicable disease: implications for research and public health

Developmental origins of non-communicable disease: implications for research and public health
Developmental origins of non-communicable disease: implications for research and public health
This White Paper highlights the developmental period as a plastic phase, which allows the organism to adapt to changes in the environment to maintain or improve reproductive capability in part through sustained health. Plasticity is more prominent prenatally and during early postnatal life, i.e., during the time of cell differentiation and specific tissue formation. These developmental periods are highly sensitive to environmental factors, such as nutrients, environmental chemicals, drugs, infections and other stressors. Nutrient and toxicant effects share many of the same characteristics and reflect two sides of the same coin. In both cases, alterations in physiological functions can be induced and may lead to the development of non-communicable conditions. Many of the major diseases – and dysfunctions – that have increased substantially in prevalence over the last 40 years seem to be related in part to developmental factors associated with either nutritional imbalance or exposures to environmental chemicals. The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) concept provides significant insight into new strategies for research and disease prevention and is sufficiently robust and repeatable across species, including humans, to require a policy and public health response. This White Paper therefore concludes that, as early development (in utero and during the first years of postnatal life) is particularly sensitive to developmental disruption by nutritional factors or environmental chemical exposures, with potentially adverse consequences for health later in life, both research and disease prevention strategies should focus more on these vulnerable life stages.
environmental exposure, fetal development, non-communicable disease, nutritional requirements, prenatal exposure delayed effects
1476-069X
42-42
Barouki, R.
38857f20-76fb-4dfe-babf-f4fea9514e68
Gluckman, Peter D.
1952fad1-abc7-4284-a0bc-a7eb31f70a3f
Grandjean, P.
7ccc53d2-b777-4c4e-a120-22a06d0633e9
Heindel, J.J.
9923f492-f5e7-4f91-84cd-89994c3f1931
Barouki, R.
38857f20-76fb-4dfe-babf-f4fea9514e68
Gluckman, Peter D.
1952fad1-abc7-4284-a0bc-a7eb31f70a3f
Grandjean, P.
7ccc53d2-b777-4c4e-a120-22a06d0633e9
Heindel, J.J.
9923f492-f5e7-4f91-84cd-89994c3f1931

Barouki, R., Gluckman, Peter D., Grandjean, P. and Heindel, J.J. (2012) Developmental origins of non-communicable disease: implications for research and public health. Environmental Health, 11, 42-42. (doi:10.1186/1476-069X-11-42).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This White Paper highlights the developmental period as a plastic phase, which allows the organism to adapt to changes in the environment to maintain or improve reproductive capability in part through sustained health. Plasticity is more prominent prenatally and during early postnatal life, i.e., during the time of cell differentiation and specific tissue formation. These developmental periods are highly sensitive to environmental factors, such as nutrients, environmental chemicals, drugs, infections and other stressors. Nutrient and toxicant effects share many of the same characteristics and reflect two sides of the same coin. In both cases, alterations in physiological functions can be induced and may lead to the development of non-communicable conditions. Many of the major diseases – and dysfunctions – that have increased substantially in prevalence over the last 40 years seem to be related in part to developmental factors associated with either nutritional imbalance or exposures to environmental chemicals. The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) concept provides significant insight into new strategies for research and disease prevention and is sufficiently robust and repeatable across species, including humans, to require a policy and public health response. This White Paper therefore concludes that, as early development (in utero and during the first years of postnatal life) is particularly sensitive to developmental disruption by nutritional factors or environmental chemical exposures, with potentially adverse consequences for health later in life, both research and disease prevention strategies should focus more on these vulnerable life stages.

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More information

Published date: 27 June 2012
Keywords: environmental exposure, fetal development, non-communicable disease, nutritional requirements, prenatal exposure delayed effects
Organisations: Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 348629
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/348629
ISSN: 1476-069X
PURE UUID: 395d78dc-f878-43be-a365-cf234aaa3793
ORCID for Peter D. Gluckman: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6907-613X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Feb 2013 09:37
Last modified: 12 Nov 2019 01:52

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