High-altitude physiology and pathophysiology: implications and relevance for intensive care medicine


Grocott, Michael, Montgomery, Hugh and Vercueil, Andre (2007) High-altitude physiology and pathophysiology: implications and relevance for intensive care medicine Chest, 11, (1), p. 203. (doi:10.1186/cc5142). (PMID:17291330).

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Description/Abstract

Cellular hypoxia is a fundamental mechanism of injury in the critically ill. The study of human responses to hypoxia occurring as a consequence of hypobaria defines the fields of high-altitude medicine and physiology. A new paradigm suggests that the physiological and pathophysiological responses to extreme environmental challenges (for example, hypobaric hypoxia, hyperbaria, microgravity, cold, heat) may be similar to responses seen in critical illness. The present review explores the idea that human responses to the hypoxia of high altitude may be used as a means of exploring elements of the pathophysiology of critical illness.

Item Type: Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): doi:10.1186/cc5142
ISSNs: 0012-3692 (print)
Subjects: Q Science > QP Physiology
R Medicine > RB Pathology
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
Organisations: Human Development & Health
ePrint ID: 348948
Date :
Date Event
February 2007Published
Date Deposited: 27 Feb 2013 10:02
Last Modified: 21 Feb 2017 15:56
Further Information:Google Scholar
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/348948

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