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Post-accession Polish migrants – their experiences of living in ‘low-demand’ social housing areas in Glasgow

Post-accession Polish migrants – their experiences of living in ‘low-demand’ social housing areas in Glasgow
Post-accession Polish migrants – their experiences of living in ‘low-demand’ social housing areas in Glasgow
Glasgow is a city well known for bringing together a ‘housing need’ with a ‘housing supply’. Post-accession Poles are the most recent population to fill the ‘void’ in Glasgow’s ‘unpopular’ and therefore low-demand housing in areas of social deprivation. In this paper we will focus on the intersection of individual paths with institutional projects occurring at specific temporal and spatial locations: through examining the housing-seeking activities of migrants and the low-demand accommodation letting activities of, for example, the Glasgow Housing Association. In the paper we examine the meanings, processes, experiences, and perceived advantages (for migrant families and for housing associations) and also the disadvantages associated with post-accession Polish families taking up and being potentially ‘steered’ into tenancies in particular areas of Glasgow.
poland, european migrants, post-accession, social housing, Glasgow, housing associations
0308-518X
329-343
McGhee, Derek
63b8ae1e-8a71-470c-b780-2f0a95631902
Heath, Sue
f4df85b4-fdde-4353-8641-08a4b9fbbcae
Trevena, Paulina
ea357454-39d9-4065-a4c7-8f77fed75760
McGhee, Derek
63b8ae1e-8a71-470c-b780-2f0a95631902
Heath, Sue
f4df85b4-fdde-4353-8641-08a4b9fbbcae
Trevena, Paulina
ea357454-39d9-4065-a4c7-8f77fed75760

McGhee, Derek, Heath, Sue and Trevena, Paulina (2013) Post-accession Polish migrants – their experiences of living in ‘low-demand’ social housing areas in Glasgow. Environment and Planning A, 45 (2), 329-343. (doi:10.1068/a45158).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Glasgow is a city well known for bringing together a ‘housing need’ with a ‘housing supply’. Post-accession Poles are the most recent population to fill the ‘void’ in Glasgow’s ‘unpopular’ and therefore low-demand housing in areas of social deprivation. In this paper we will focus on the intersection of individual paths with institutional projects occurring at specific temporal and spatial locations: through examining the housing-seeking activities of migrants and the low-demand accommodation letting activities of, for example, the Glasgow Housing Association. In the paper we examine the meanings, processes, experiences, and perceived advantages (for migrant families and for housing associations) and also the disadvantages associated with post-accession Polish families taking up and being potentially ‘steered’ into tenancies in particular areas of Glasgow.

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Published date: 2013
Keywords: poland, european migrants, post-accession, social housing, Glasgow, housing associations
Organisations: Sociology, Social Policy & Criminology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 348992
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/348992
ISSN: 0308-518X
PURE UUID: fdfedbbf-9cec-4b14-9971-26305d80b616
ORCID for Derek McGhee: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3226-6300

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Mar 2013 17:00
Last modified: 05 Nov 2019 01:54

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