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An investigation of the evidence of benefits from climate compatible development

An investigation of the evidence of benefits from climate compatible development
An investigation of the evidence of benefits from climate compatible development
Climate change is likely to have profound effects on developing countries both through the climate impacts experienced, but also through the policies, programmes and projects adopted to address climate change. Climate change mitigation (actions taken to reduce the extent of climate change), adaptation (actions taken to ameliorate the impacts), and on-going development are all critical to reduce current and future losses associated with climate change, and to harness gains. In the context of limited resources to invest in climate change, policies, programmes, or projects that deliver ‘triple wins’ (i.e. generating climate adaptation, mitigation and development benefits) – also known as climate compatible development – are increasingly discussed by bilateral and multilateral donors. Yet there remains an absence of empirical evidence of the benefits and costs of triple win policies. The purpose of this paper is therefore to assess evidence of ‘triple wins’ on the ground, and the feasibility of triple wins that do not generate negative impacts. We describe the theoretical linkages that exist between adaptation, mitigation and development, as well as the trade-offs and synergies that might exist between them. Using four developing country studies, we make a simple assessment of the extent of climate compatible development policy in practice through the lens of ‘no-regrets’, ‘low regrets’ and ‘with regrets’ decision making. The lack of evidence of either policy or practice of triple wins significantly limits the capacity of donors to identify, monitor or evaluate ‘triple wins at this point in time. We recommend a more strategic assessment of the distributional and financial implications of 'triple wins' policies.
1753-1330
44
Sustainability Research Institute
Tompkins, Emma L.
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Mensah, Adelina
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King, Lesley
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Long, Tran Kim
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Lawson, Elaine T.
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Hutton, Craig W.
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Hoang, Viet Anh
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Gordon, Chris
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Fish, Marianne
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Dyer, Jen
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Bood, Nadia
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Tompkins, Emma L.
a6116704-7140-4e37-bea1-2cbf39b138c3
Mensah, Adelina
fca35d21-67bf-4ba0-b289-2a32b6758c9e
King, Lesley
a34882d1-daa3-4049-b89d-35bb038e5e1d
Long, Tran Kim
4ba130c1-c2c7-43b8-a396-c31e109dfd4c
Lawson, Elaine T.
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Hutton, Craig W.
9102617b-caf7-4538-9414-c29e72f5fe2e
Hoang, Viet Anh
a617d627-d24b-4c6f-9898-4afd675e83d0
Gordon, Chris
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Fish, Marianne
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Dyer, Jen
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Bood, Nadia
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Tompkins, Emma L., Mensah, Adelina, King, Lesley, Long, Tran Kim, Lawson, Elaine T., Hutton, Craig W., Hoang, Viet Anh, Gordon, Chris, Fish, Marianne, Dyer, Jen and Bood, Nadia (2013) An investigation of the evidence of benefits from climate compatible development (Sustainability Research Institute Paper, 44) London, GB. Sustainability Research Institute 27pp.

Record type: Monograph (Working Paper)

Abstract

Climate change is likely to have profound effects on developing countries both through the climate impacts experienced, but also through the policies, programmes and projects adopted to address climate change. Climate change mitigation (actions taken to reduce the extent of climate change), adaptation (actions taken to ameliorate the impacts), and on-going development are all critical to reduce current and future losses associated with climate change, and to harness gains. In the context of limited resources to invest in climate change, policies, programmes, or projects that deliver ‘triple wins’ (i.e. generating climate adaptation, mitigation and development benefits) – also known as climate compatible development – are increasingly discussed by bilateral and multilateral donors. Yet there remains an absence of empirical evidence of the benefits and costs of triple win policies. The purpose of this paper is therefore to assess evidence of ‘triple wins’ on the ground, and the feasibility of triple wins that do not generate negative impacts. We describe the theoretical linkages that exist between adaptation, mitigation and development, as well as the trade-offs and synergies that might exist between them. Using four developing country studies, we make a simple assessment of the extent of climate compatible development policy in practice through the lens of ‘no-regrets’, ‘low regrets’ and ‘with regrets’ decision making. The lack of evidence of either policy or practice of triple wins significantly limits the capacity of donors to identify, monitor or evaluate ‘triple wins at this point in time. We recommend a more strategic assessment of the distributional and financial implications of 'triple wins' policies.

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More information

Published date: January 2013
Additional Information: Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy Working Paper No. 124
Organisations: Global Env Change & Earth Observation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 349080
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/349080
ISSN: 1753-1330
PURE UUID: ca508593-bd93-4921-898e-c850de24d811
ORCID for Craig W. Hutton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5896-756X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Feb 2013 09:33
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 01:47

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Contributors

Author: Adelina Mensah
Author: Lesley King
Author: Tran Kim Long
Author: Elaine T. Lawson
Author: Craig W. Hutton ORCID iD
Author: Viet Anh Hoang
Author: Chris Gordon
Author: Marianne Fish
Author: Jen Dyer
Author: Nadia Bood

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