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The developmental origins of ageing

The developmental origins of ageing
The developmental origins of ageing
Interest in the connection between development, growth and ageing is not new. However, recognition of the relevance to human ageing is more recent and has arisen from the growing field of research into the developmental origins of health and disease. Epidemiological evidence has demonstrated strong links between small size at birth and increased mortality and also morbidity from age-related conditions such as cardiovascular disease, types 2 diabetes, sarcopenia and osteoporosis. Understanding the role of developmental influences in ageing is relevant to clinical practice for several reasons. It provides an opportunity for early identification of individuals at risk of accelerated ageing. It also suggests that the window for instituting beneficial interventions should be widened to include all stages of the life course. Furthermore, knowledge of underlying mechanisms at the cellular and molecular level has the potential to inform the development of novel therapeutic agents to minimize the detrimental effects of ageing.
developmental origins, ageing, musculoskeletal ageing, sarcopenia, skeletal muscle, osteoporosis, bone, epidemiology, life course, birth weight, developmental plasticity
9781119952930
81-91
Wiley-Blackwell
Aihie Sayer, A.
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Sinclair, A.J.
Morley, J.E.
Vellas, B.
Aihie Sayer, A.
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Sinclair, A.J.
Morley, J.E.
Vellas, B.

Aihie Sayer, A. and Cooper, C. (2012) The developmental origins of ageing. In, Sinclair, A.J., Morley, J.E. and Vellas, B. (eds.) Pathy's Principles and Practice of Geriatric Medicine (5th Ed.). Oxford, GB. Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 81-91. (doi:10.1002/9781119952930.ch8).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Interest in the connection between development, growth and ageing is not new. However, recognition of the relevance to human ageing is more recent and has arisen from the growing field of research into the developmental origins of health and disease. Epidemiological evidence has demonstrated strong links between small size at birth and increased mortality and also morbidity from age-related conditions such as cardiovascular disease, types 2 diabetes, sarcopenia and osteoporosis. Understanding the role of developmental influences in ageing is relevant to clinical practice for several reasons. It provides an opportunity for early identification of individuals at risk of accelerated ageing. It also suggests that the window for instituting beneficial interventions should be widened to include all stages of the life course. Furthermore, knowledge of underlying mechanisms at the cellular and molecular level has the potential to inform the development of novel therapeutic agents to minimize the detrimental effects of ageing.

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More information

Published date: 30 April 2012
Keywords: developmental origins, ageing, musculoskeletal ageing, sarcopenia, skeletal muscle, osteoporosis, bone, epidemiology, life course, birth weight, developmental plasticity
Organisations: Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 349099
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/349099
ISBN: 9781119952930
PURE UUID: 235b6282-f612-4ece-892a-092f26b2c572
ORCID for C. Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Feb 2013 16:37
Last modified: 10 Apr 2019 00:37

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