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Seminal prostasomes inhibit the angiogenesis activity of rat aortic rings.

Seminal prostasomes inhibit the angiogenesis activity of rat aortic rings.
Seminal prostasomes inhibit the angiogenesis activity of rat aortic rings.
Prostasomes are organelles secreted by prostatic epithelial cells, and are believed to have a role in fertility and prostatic disease. They are known to influence sperm motility and the acrosome reaction, and are thought to have a role in cell transformation, immunosuppression, proliferation, facilitation of local invasion, and angiogenesis. Previously, we have demonstrated the inhibitory effect of prostasomes derived from human semen on angiogenesis using HUVEC cells grown on matrigel. In this study, we use the rat aortic ring assay system, arguably a closer reflection of the in vivo situation. Quantification was by a spectrophotometric method, and underlying mechanisms assessed. Prostasomes demonstrated a clear inhibition of angiogenesis, and this effect persisted after heat treatment of prostasomes to denature protein. This fits with other known effects of prostasomes known to be due to the membrane lipid component, which is unusually high in sphingomyelin and cholesterol.
prostasomes, angiogenesis, lipid, aorta
1365-7852
444-447
Delves, G.H.
6148e70a-8575-40e5-a875-2eda6577391c
Goyal, A.
e3236f2e-22ea-4367-84e4-b2d51f06129e
Lwaleed, B.A.
e7c59131-82ad-4a14-a227-7370e91e3f21
Cooper, A.J.
8a21c297-eda3-4479-8e81-1de258c8e2a1
Delves, G.H.
6148e70a-8575-40e5-a875-2eda6577391c
Goyal, A.
e3236f2e-22ea-4367-84e4-b2d51f06129e
Lwaleed, B.A.
e7c59131-82ad-4a14-a227-7370e91e3f21
Cooper, A.J.
8a21c297-eda3-4479-8e81-1de258c8e2a1

Delves, G.H., Goyal, A., Lwaleed, B.A. and Cooper, A.J. (2006) Seminal prostasomes inhibit the angiogenesis activity of rat aortic rings. Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases, 9 (4), 444-447. (doi:10.1038/sj.pcan.4500896). (PMID:16832381)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Prostasomes are organelles secreted by prostatic epithelial cells, and are believed to have a role in fertility and prostatic disease. They are known to influence sperm motility and the acrosome reaction, and are thought to have a role in cell transformation, immunosuppression, proliferation, facilitation of local invasion, and angiogenesis. Previously, we have demonstrated the inhibitory effect of prostasomes derived from human semen on angiogenesis using HUVEC cells grown on matrigel. In this study, we use the rat aortic ring assay system, arguably a closer reflection of the in vivo situation. Quantification was by a spectrophotometric method, and underlying mechanisms assessed. Prostasomes demonstrated a clear inhibition of angiogenesis, and this effect persisted after heat treatment of prostasomes to denature protein. This fits with other known effects of prostasomes known to be due to the membrane lipid component, which is unusually high in sphingomyelin and cholesterol.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 11 July 2006
Published date: 2006
Keywords: prostasomes, angiogenesis, lipid, aorta
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 349138
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/349138
ISSN: 1365-7852
PURE UUID: 3c787ba0-98b5-4f7e-8437-15114b53a706

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Date deposited: 25 Feb 2013 16:42
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:42

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