The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The impact of Southern Ocean sea ice in a global ocean model

The impact of Southern Ocean sea ice in a global ocean model
The impact of Southern Ocean sea ice in a global ocean model
Most of the Southern Ocean (SO) is marginally stably stratified and thus prone to enhanced convection and possibly bottom-water formation whenever the upper ocean is cooled or made more saline by ice formation. Sea ice modifies the heat and freshwater fluxes, which in turn constitute a critical surface condition in this sensitive region of intense vertical exchange. The authors investigate the effect of SO sea ice in modifying these fluxes in a global, coarse-resolution, primitive-equation ocean general circulation model, which has been coupled to a comprehensive dynamic–thermodynamic sea ice model. Specifically, the long-term impact of a series of modifications in the formulation of the sea ice model and its forcing on quantities such as the overturning circulation, the deep ocean water-mass characteristics, the sea ice thickness, the strength of convection, as well as the strength of the major volume transports are investigated. The results indicate that the rate of Antarctic bottom-water formation is strongly coupled to the local sea ice processes in the SO, which in turn vary sensitively depending on their model formulation and their forcing from the atmosphere. The largest impacts arise from the effect of brine release due to sea ice formation and that of employing more variable winds over SO sea ice.
0022-3670
1999-2018
Stössel, Achim
84c06fbd-158b-47d9-9664-40f75e3ba647
Kim, Seong-Joong
4cede976-1e17-4087-a4e8-9908697b77c1
Drijfhout, Sybren S.
a5c76079-179b-490c-93fe-fc0391aacf13
Stössel, Achim
84c06fbd-158b-47d9-9664-40f75e3ba647
Kim, Seong-Joong
4cede976-1e17-4087-a4e8-9908697b77c1
Drijfhout, Sybren S.
a5c76079-179b-490c-93fe-fc0391aacf13

Stössel, Achim, Kim, Seong-Joong and Drijfhout, Sybren S. (1998) The impact of Southern Ocean sea ice in a global ocean model. Journal of Physical Oceanography, 28 (10), 1999-2018. (doi:10.1175/1520-0485(1998)028<1999:TIOSOS>2.0.CO;2).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Most of the Southern Ocean (SO) is marginally stably stratified and thus prone to enhanced convection and possibly bottom-water formation whenever the upper ocean is cooled or made more saline by ice formation. Sea ice modifies the heat and freshwater fluxes, which in turn constitute a critical surface condition in this sensitive region of intense vertical exchange. The authors investigate the effect of SO sea ice in modifying these fluxes in a global, coarse-resolution, primitive-equation ocean general circulation model, which has been coupled to a comprehensive dynamic–thermodynamic sea ice model. Specifically, the long-term impact of a series of modifications in the formulation of the sea ice model and its forcing on quantities such as the overturning circulation, the deep ocean water-mass characteristics, the sea ice thickness, the strength of convection, as well as the strength of the major volume transports are investigated. The results indicate that the rate of Antarctic bottom-water formation is strongly coupled to the local sea ice processes in the SO, which in turn vary sensitively depending on their model formulation and their forcing from the atmosphere. The largest impacts arise from the effect of brine release due to sea ice formation and that of employing more variable winds over SO sea ice.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: October 1998
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 349203
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/349203
ISSN: 0022-3670
PURE UUID: ae018752-eab7-4d7b-9480-193689a646e4

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Feb 2013 12:22
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:42

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Achim Stössel
Author: Seong-Joong Kim

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×